Bio Digester slurry

Discussion in 'Talking Point' started by rodders, Dec 31, 2018.

  1. rodders

    rodders Well-Known Member

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    Hi all, anyone one here ever put bio digester slurry on their ground? What’s it like? Would there be a risk of botulism to cattle with it? Thanks.
     
  2. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    Never used it myself but wouldn't think there's a botulism risk as no dead flesh

    Think @recycled may have spread some
     
  3. recycled

    recycled Moderator

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    that out of a farm ad or an industrial ad plant , either way its far better than standard slurry , usually the same n value but you get more usable N out of it its really good for getting the grass growing in spring or just after youve had a cut of silage of it . the plant round here pasturises everything before it goes into there plant so there "shouldnt " be any risk of botulism
     
  4. recycled

    recycled Moderator

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    biggest problem round here with ad is no one from the plant to the lorry drivers have a clue how farming works , they dont have enough on site storage and cant understand why farmers dont want to fill there towers full of the stuff in november/dec :rolleyes2::rolleyes2:
     
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  5. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Moderator

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    I was talking to a guy working for a company with a digester that is using all the brown bin or food waste from bin collections as it’s feed source, he was looking for a land bank for spreading this stuff. He told me he would send on the details etc next week.
     
  6. jcb411abuser

    jcb411abuser Well-Known Member

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    It is a disease risk. Unless managed properly and how many of ourselves cut corners where we shouldn't. It's all about the feedstock.
    We used a lot of it this year at home and we've had several abortions from salmonella. We didn't vaccinate as we've never had it before. Now either it came from wild birds or from the digestate.
    We were lead to believe that the feedstock being used was grass silage and beet but it turns out they were slipping in a few random loads of hen litter when it became available.
    A digester is the perfect medium for the production of these pathogens as it's warm and wet. I believe a huge help would be to inject it into the soil to stop it directly contaminating the leaf. Other than that you'd need to add lime to it to disinfect it.
     
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  7. Claas Grass

    Claas Grass Well-Known Member

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    Any areas in particular they’re looking for land.
     
  8. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Moderator

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    30 mile radius of Youghal. The man up north of cahir we both no gets some sort of compost stuff from the same company. Ormond organics I think is the name
     
  9. Big Vern

    Big Vern Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear you've had losses due to being sold the wrong stuff,, if as you say the ad plant was putting in chicken litter and flogging it as being with out then surely legal representation should be sought, ?? N'est pas ??

    When our digestate was applied we had the option of including "chicken waste products " or not, the boss chose not , all ours was injected with a trailed disc jobby thing behind the tanker, he'll off a bit of kit, operator knew his onions,
    Sadly the plebeians who do the support with nurse tanks and arctics are a different stew,,,, , all right mate yeah don't drive any where near that piece of land there there's a drainage problem and it's wet,,,,
    They managed to get one of the arctics bogged right in and made hell of a mess getting it out,,, knobs,,,,,
     
  10. Claas Grass

    Claas Grass Well-Known Member

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    I’ll be skiing with him in a few days time I’ll ask him during the apres ski what’s he using :laugh: I thought most of their stuff was from human waste plants.
     
  11. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Moderator

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    TD? I was talking to him today and he was all talk about beet and winter wheat seed
     
  12. Claas Grass

    Claas Grass Well-Known Member

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    Ya going to Austria a day or two after Lamma for a week, might be organising it now because it will be far from his mind then :laugh:
     
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  13. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Moderator

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    What part? He was asking me about places a few weeks back now that you
    Mention it
     
  14. Claas Grass

    Claas Grass Well-Known Member

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    Zell am See in Austria, he is going for a week, I’m only a pauper so 5 days.
     
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  15. laoisfarmer

    laoisfarmer Well-Known Member

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    Spread some this year on stubbles in front of the ploughs , will see how it goes .
     
  16. sir chips

    sir chips Well-Known Member

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    Lovely place, was there a few times.
    Make sure you have lunch in the breikectalm on the schmittenhoe. Great food and craic up there.
     
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  17. Claas Grass

    Claas Grass Well-Known Member

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    Cheers, I’ve never been there before but a friend who used go somewhere different skiing every year told me it’s the one place he went to two years in a row which sold it to me.
     
  18. AYF

    AYF Well-Known Member

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    Appart from the fact that it isn't liquid.
    Has FYM, as apposed to slurry, got good gas providing values to it?

    I understand that other things are required with slurry to make big yields of gas. But if a digester could be built for straw based FYM would it work?
     
  19. recycled

    recycled Moderator

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    slurry itself ist all that great at producing gas compaired to food waist , rye,, silage maize etc , it does produce some , but you need to keep things liquid to allow the bugs to do there job which is why they use slurry
     
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  20. Kieran97

    Kieran97 Well-Known Member

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    The slurry on its own is no good, it has to be mixed generally with something more solid to make it bulkier, a sort of "soup". Often straw, FYM itself.

    The teagasc one mixes FYM and slurry. See the video.



    Straw itself could be a useful fuel for power generation, carbon neutral. Apparently when straw gets rained on and is left on the floor for a while, it removes whatever is in the straw that normally corrodes the boiler. Could be a great outlet for 'lesser quality' straw.

    OSR straw is particularly calorifically dense.

    Fixed price contracts for straw could be very useful in future, farmer is guaranteed a price for their straw and so long as moisture is sub 20% you're ok. Obviously, supply and demand. If straw ends up being used for power stations. it will drive up the price for everyone else. It could end up being a useful fuel for all the former peat burning plants here in Ireland.
     
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  21. AYF

    AYF Well-Known Member

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    Yeah. Suppose what goes on in a dung heap is aerobic digestion so produces different gasses form different bacteria.
     
  22. recycled

    recycled Moderator

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    same gas . all about efficiency though . its a bit like hay the more moisture in it the quicker it rots
     
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