Feed out pictures.

Discussion in 'Stock Talk' started by johndeere6920s, Sep 11, 2016.

  1. drew

    drew Well-Known Member

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    Hard to disagree on the rattle box driving you mad :lol: but I wonder is it taking a bit longer for your mix to get chopped without the added choping affect that the top knife gives it on the way in and the fact that the fingers grab the material and cause it to roll over more?

    3 atm could easily be reduced if I made up a bucket to fit into the shear grab which I have wanted to do for a few years now. The tractor would only be running for a few minutes putting in the bucket of meal
     
  2. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    So I done a bit of timing today.
    keenan 140 is the mixer, class 640 driving it atm @430rpms, loading with MF 5455 and cubic meter bucket. yard is a mix of new and old, forages with 10m of the feeder, grains 50m, liquid 100m. all sheds withing 50m of mixing. Feeder is full for each mix. had twines off straw etc, so everything ready to go

    - 0 - both machines running
    - 16.30mins - I was finished loading so loader tractor turned off. Taught I would be quicker but there is a bucket of liquid feed going into this.
    - 4 mins - let the feeder mix beyond loading
    - 10 mins - unloading. 3 runs, and have to back into dead end passage.
    - 9 mins - had 2 pens in this mix where I had to use the loader bucket to feed into. typical for most old yards probably.

    I clocked 57 minutes of machinery running, 30 with mixer and 27 with loader @ €45 an hour (???) is say €43. burned about 6ltrs of diesel.

    Time wise - using the diet feeder Im feeding an animal every 11 seconds, I remember timing last year and nearly certain It was taking 8 seconds with just the loader and layered pit. loader size was a big limiting factor in digging straight from the pit. If I had a big loading shovel and 2 to 3cub bucket would halve this time I would think.

    waste is the same in either system, throw in shite, there will be waste, no crap, no waste



    Sorry for this boring shite, but when you spend allot of time loading a feeder I do some serious boring calculations
     
  3. ShaneB140

    ShaneB140 Well-Known Member

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    Implement, guys we feed for chop out the silage evening before and open the bales, everything is loaded with a bucket then, no changing when mixing, 11-12 loads a day, you couldn’t be changing for every load.
     
  4. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Moderator

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    How would you manage to feed all those ingredients, especially grains or liquid stuff without a feeder? I doubt you would go walking around the yard with buckets....
     
  5. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    it begs the question, are we making our diets complicated to make our system work in our heads. Should we have a more balanced forage in the pit to start with. Have all ingredients in the pit or mix on the floor. I mixed on the floor last year and its is suprisingly quick. Left the feeder parked and didnt see any difference in thrive. All be it I was only mixing one grain into what was in the pit along with liquid.
     
  6. Peter

    Peter Well-Known Member

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    It probably is taking longer without the rack. I bought a few
    loads of bales to help strech out my own silage so I'm feeding them out ATM.
     
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  7. Claas Grass

    Claas Grass Well-Known Member

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    I think some lads use their calculators a little too much, I have a customer I call “mr calculator” every single thing he does has to be broken down into a mathematical equation, if you told him you’d give him something for free he could work out a theorem to prove that I should be paying him to take it, over analysis that often comes back to bite him.
     
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  8. scoffcruddle

    scoffcruddle Well-Known Member

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    My diets more complicated purely because of low silage stocks due to the drought,taking twice as long to feed as last winter but also due to more animals,like everything there is a sweet spot.

    Having all ingredients in the pit is a cash flow problem.
     
  9. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    its what i do when at boring reppeditive jobs, when your in a tiny margin business, you have to know everythings cost unfortunately
     
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  10. scoffcruddle

    scoffcruddle Well-Known Member

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    A very good habit to get into,way too many cant do the sums!
     
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  11. drew

    drew Well-Known Member

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    I find it hard to disagree with the idea of a layered pit being simpler but I do also see some major issues with it in practical terms.

    The first I see and it’s the biggest thing is that it suits if your feeding one type of animal. In our own case if we were back to pit then there’d be a mix of dry suckers, weanlings and fats trying to feed from the one pit. The cows certainly don’t need to be eating meal as they do plenty well on straight silage here never mind the added cost of feeding them meal, then how do you balance the mix so that it’s right for both weanlings and fats, 2 groups which need different diets.

    Ok you could argue that layer the bottom of the pit and leave the top of it as straight silage for the cows, but then what happens when the feed out rates are different.

    The other thing I see is in our case we use our own grain for the feeding. It would mean either having to sell then buy back at a far inflated price in the summer or else having to store barley almost right around the calendar to have it there to mix into the pit.

    I do think in our own case a feeder is probably over complicating things a little but it also means we’re not physically carrying buckets of meal to feed cattle, not physically mixing the barley and soya on the ground with a shovel and once it’s fed it’s into a trough so no major work forking it back in and the troughs have greatly reduced a wastage issue we had with crows pulling feed out. Then there’s also the fact that head space is a bit restricted here and the feeder means when any animal gets to the barrier there’s the same feed there for them
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2018
  12. Arthur

    Arthur Well-Known Member

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    I'm using a variation of that, my diet feeder can be seen in the foreground :laugh: IMG_20181231_094527.jpg blocks in every second day and a bit of badly needed exercise for myself as required. Pit located between 2 sheds so only travelling a short distance with the blocks of silage.
     
  13. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    mixes took 7 minutes extra today as I came across a few squares of barley straw

    would you not nudge them in with the tractor, and feic the fitness training

    Its what works best for every farm. But you could have you base forage/pit mix that all animals get, and they increase the strenght of it my mixing in grain on the ground for the finishers or protein for the stores
     
  14. Arthur

    Arthur Well-Known Member

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    I have on occasion, drop the block and give it a quarter turn and push it up against the feed barrier, I'd only do it if I needed to be away for a day or 2, I could build 2 days of silage in front of them, why I don't do it all the time is they would get very fussy with too much to choose from and intake would more than likely drop overall.
     
  15. nashmach

    nashmach Moderator

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    And I thought I was a rough operator shoving in bales with the 3600 and transport box :blushing:
     
  16. Mf240

    Mf240 Well-Known Member

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    Try to keep it simpleish. All bales. (thought I said simple) milking cows and a handful of finishing cattle getting the best bales. Milkers get their concentrates twice a day at milking and the finishers get it once a day at back of pens. Weanlings also on the better bales with the smaller ones getting meal once a day. Store cattle and dry cows get the second quality bales with a bale of straw every now and again to stretch it. Sometimes if the milkers had some silage left I'd throw it across to the drys to clean up before putting in fresh bales.
     
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  17. muckymanor

    muckymanor Well-Known Member

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    Seems like everything needed silage today. IMG_20190102_153320.jpg 1140828.jpg
     
  18. mixed fleet

    mixed fleet Well-Known Member

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    Do you remember the good summer of 2018 .Best hay I've had in years .
    20190106_083619.jpg
     
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  19. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    I have become a big fan of hay since this winter, no wrap to dispose of, a bale seems to feed allot of animals and no pressure on machinery shifting them
     
  20. jf 850

    jf 850 Well-Known Member

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    I made a bit myself in early June, in weather the likes of which may never be seen again. You would eat it yourself. True for you on most of your points on the merits of hay.

    In the words of Pat Shortt,

    "It would be great little country , if we had a roof on it " :rolleyes2:. Most summers , you should a meadow cut the 2nd time , waiting for haymaking weather that often never comes .:boat:
     
  21. johndeere6920s

    johndeere6920s Well-Known Member

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    Baled about 700 bales of hay that I would class as too fit this year.
    It's was so brittle it just broke up in your hands.
     
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  22. Mf 7715

    Mf 7715 Well-Known Member

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    Def lads wanted to wait another day to make sure it was "dry enough" when it was already burnt to a crisp.
     
  23. scoffcruddle

    scoffcruddle Well-Known Member

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    What's the saying "more bad hay made in a good year than a bad year"

    I wrapped mine as haylage but it's actually more like hay,beautiful stuff but I'm saving it for now.
     
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  24. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    I'm not selling much of mine yet either
     
  25. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    I cut mine with straight disc mower (about 5 bale ac crop), didnt get around to turning it, and we raked it straight from the swards 5 mins before the baler. As green as silage and bone dry. I will never make hay like it again
     

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