Fertilizer and Frost

Discussion in 'Grassland Management' started by muckymanor, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. dstig

    dstig Well-Known Member

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    Everything still in the bag here, heavy rain forecast for the next few days so will hang tough, ground still very soft here
     
  2. padraig barron

    padraig barron Well-Known Member

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    Well I know if we hadn't to go with early urea we would have no grass at this point. Urea is working away. Sure if it would have been a normal year you'd be on the second round almost with second application of N on
     
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  3. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    exactly
    i accidentally on purpose ran out in 1 or 2 fields and you can see what didnt get urea
     
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  4. CoNaMi

    CoNaMi Well-Known Member

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    Went with urea end of Feb and up until this week I was undecided if it was lost or not but you can definitely see now that it has had a good effect.
     
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  5. Seedsower

    Seedsower Well-Known Member

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    Do you have some un spread ground to compare it to?
    Things have greened up mighty in the last week thank god
     
  6. CoNaMi

    CoNaMi Well-Known Member

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    I do and while some of it wouldn't be a fair comparison as it was too wet to spread there's definitely better covers on ground that got the urea.
    Was there some of it lost?
    I'd say so.
    If I waited another month to spread it would I have as much grass?
    Probably.
    Would get good results here normally from early Feb urea but will admit that I'll be keeping more of an eye on soil temp in the future.
     
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  7. Seedsower

    Seedsower Well-Known Member

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    I normally spread urea late January or early February but 16th match was my first outing this year. The few days before the snow was the only time I thought ground good enough but I read somewhere not to spread if a drop in temperatures was forecast so didn't spread.as usual the only thing working in cold weather was slurry
     
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  8. muckymanor

    muckymanor Well-Known Member

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    The last 5 days brought some serious growth in the ground that got Urea on February 24th. It's now streets ahead of ground that didn't get it.
    I have some of the heavier covers that got urea eaten off and the regrowth has been phenomenal - only in the last 5 days however.
    As I said above, the ground that was bare when getting urea is by far the heaviest cover at this stage.
    It's lovely to see that wave of grass in the wind!

    Got my rougher grazing for the few cows covered with 18.6.12 at the weekend at 1 bag to the acre. Hopefully today's rain won't wash it all away. It's esker type land with lots of humps and hollows and bog at the lower end which is only 12 inches deep before you meed a lovely gravel. With the expected growth, it should really take off. I hope to let some cows with calves go off at the weekend!
     
  9. Seedsower

    Seedsower Well-Known Member

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    Chatting a dairy farmer today and paddocks grazed in late February have more grass now than ones not grazed yet!
     
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  10. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Tillage Moderator

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    That's very common most years, clean off the old stuff to motivate the new growth. I'd be similar, paddocks grazed the snow week will need to be grazed in the next 7-10 days or they will be almost too strong then.
     
  11. mixed fleet

    mixed fleet Well-Known Member

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    Pig slurry about a month ago, no bag.
    See where I turned.
    20180418_122021.jpg
     
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  12. WestCorkBoy

    WestCorkBoy Well-Known Member

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    Any wise heads know why slurry is so effective in cold weather compared to bagged fertilizer?
     
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  13. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Tillage Moderator

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    Anything to do with the fact that say 3k gallons of slurry is say 6-7-35 per 1k gallons, who would spread 3 bags per acre of that in wet weather tho? In wet, damp, cool, dull weather the N is not lost either, might be something to do with the p and k kick also. Other than that I haven't a clue....
     
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  14. WestCorkBoy

    WestCorkBoy Well-Known Member

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    i don't know either, plenty lads spreading 46 units of nitrogen in early feb saw much lower response than 12-15 units of N in slurry spread at the same time. So is it uptake/availability or a P/K issue. Is there a different biological process going on? just throwing it out there.
     
  15. Seedsower

    Seedsower Well-Known Member

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    Don't know what it is but it's the same every spring though more noticeable this year.
    There are trace elements and nutrients as well as npk in slurry
    @CORK Any ideas
     
  16. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    I’m thinking that the N in slurry is just more quickly available to the plant,
    That little head start can give the slurry grass the edge, especially if it’s followed by cold weather.
    Also, February rainfall in my local met station was below normal so that increases the chance of the fertilizer sitting on the soil while the slurry N was already in around the roots.
    You’d see the same in winter barley, the crop that gets the N that bit earlier will always look that but leafier
     

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