Grab or Fork

Discussion in 'Machinery Matters' started by lough, Sep 13, 2019.

  1. lough

    lough Well-Known Member

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    Which would be the best to buy, the one with the grab or the one without. Main jobs would be loading seaweed and would they be suitable for feeding bales in a slatted shed.

    upload_2019-9-13_23-4-56.jpeg

    upload_2019-9-13_23-6-43.jpeg
     
  2. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    Personally I wouldn't feed bales with either, just use a two tag version.
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Member

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    For the seaweed, the grab has to be a huge advantage
     
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  4. AYF

    AYF Well-Known Member

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    All depends what you want doing with the bales
    If your shaking them out then grab all the way.
    Problem with grabs s needing to hitch and unhitch the pipes every time
     
  5. diesel power

    diesel power Well-Known Member

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    For bales the grab is the only one. You can shake out the bales with it which is very handy. For picking up seaweed I would imagine the grab would be very handy as well.
     
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  6. bk1991

    bk1991 Well-Known Member

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    I have both here a 4ft grab and a 4ft fork I never use the fork tbh the grab is just so much more usefull when feeding out bales or loading bales its easier to hold the bales from saging . Even for dung bushes trees loads more uses and ul bring more material in a grab than a fork
     
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  7. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    Grab all the way.

    As others said. Holding and shaking any kind of a bale.

    Moving branches or scrub. We don’t have cattle anymore but still wouldn’t be without the silage grab.

    I’m still waiting on @ithastopay ‘s second installment of the Cork fixing everything with twine & visegrips series :lol:
     
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  8. Burdizzo

    Burdizzo Well-Known Member

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    Bought this manure fork this morning. Ex display but value compared to some quotes I got. Wangled a jacket in too. A grab would've been nice but new is dear and don't have time to trawl 2nd hand.
    20200125_093316.jpg
     
  9. lough

    lough Well-Known Member

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    There is no bargains in 2nd hand grabs, anyone ones that are cheap, the rams are rusted, bent tines, missing tines, the new ones aren't dear when you compare them.
     
  10. Burdizzo

    Burdizzo Well-Known Member

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    I was afraid of the quality of some of the cheaper brands of tine grabs though.
     
  11. cormywormy

    cormywormy Well-Known Member

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    same here , have both here and never use the fork. Bought a second hand grab and it’s the best thing ever.
     
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  12. AYF

    AYF Well-Known Member

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    Was going to say the same!
    A grab is usually retired when it's beyond repairing!!
     
  13. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    I think you can say the same with a lot of front loader attachments. Looking at wider buckets here and It's the same story.
     
  14. bk1991

    bk1991 Well-Known Member

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    what bucket u going for ?
     
  15. greenhorn

    greenhorn Well-Known Member

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    Stay clear of rossmore buckets anyway! 7ft one here with near no use has rusted out
     
  16. bk1991

    bk1991 Well-Known Member

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    same here when we got the tractor dad got new rossmore bucket 5ft. When our tractor was delivered it came with a 4ft quickie bucket untill the other bucket came into dealer. The 4ft Quickie held more than the Rossmore much deeper and nicer designed with more crowd and deeper on the base it didn't spill as much. The paint work isnt good on the Rossmore When I upgrade I’d like to get a 6ft Quickie
     
  17. massey 6480

    massey 6480 Well-Known Member

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    There’s a 7ft here that’s 13 yrs old that’s taken dogs abuse still in great nick . Inch blade on it with little wear .
     
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  18. eire23

    eire23 Well-Known Member

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    Bought the 6ft quicke bucket a few weeks back. Happy with it, went for the lighter one and didn't think we needed the heavy duty one.
     
  19. greenhorn

    greenhorn Well-Known Member

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    One here will be 15 years this year. As i said little to no work and its more like a sieve than a bucket at this stage.
     
  20. Arthur

    Arthur Well-Known Member

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    30 yr old 7' Quicke here, wouldn't be overworked but still in perfect condition. It's sister sheargrab still on the go too got a new tine barrel 4 years ago, original cutting edge.
     
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  21. lough

    lough Well-Known Member

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    It's probably the steel, I have a link box that I got made and it's full of holes as well even though it is kept in the shed every night. The old one lay outside all this time and is in the same condition as the day it was left there. The new one, if you battered it with the hammer, a big flake of rust would fall of it.
     
  22. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    Haven't done much on it at all to be honest, a good second hand would be more than good enough for what it would do here but they are very scarce. We have an older 4ft bucket which had lots of welding and plating which we use for the rougher type work, picking stones, drawing filling etc.

    A 6ft would probably be ideal given the loader type and size of tractor.
     
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