70s tractor poll

Best tractor produced in the 70s


  • Total voters
    69

candor

Moderator/IT Guy
I did the handbrake band on my 674 by taking off the hydraulic top cover. I've been told it could be done through a plate in the side of the backend but had the cover off anyway for putting a spring back in place.

The brakes needing to be pumped sounds like the orings in the trumpet housing needing replaced. Never any bother on the one here.
 

Peter

Well-Known Member
2 brothers up the road from bought their farm in 1970 , did a phenomenal amount of reclamation during the 70s , bought 2 more bits of farms during the same decade . Bought a lot of Fr calves , and mountainy ewes to stock them .
In their wisdom , they decided to Buy a double chop to cut their own silage , driven by an 8011 . Then , surely the best way to pay for the new Kidd harvester , was to cut a few neighbours grass for them . One of them couldn't even drive , and the other had the mechanical ability to operate a 135 and a transport box , at a stretch. It was a well know place for chaps that left school early to get a job . Plenty of work , poor wages , and poorer grub and conditions.
They had 2 8011s , and a new 12011 in early 1979 . The brother who drove , operated the harvester , in a fashion . He couldn't master the fishtail hitch , and lad who was drawing in , had the job of hitching the harvester to the empty trailer ,before hauling the full trailer back to the heap .
In short , these 3 Crystal's put an awful lot of men off Zetors for life in our area . They fell apart burnt oil and were wrecked by the time they were 5 yrs old .
In reality , the same men shouldn't have been long a crowbar . Because they'd bend it in a bog . They paid peanuts , small peanuts , and got monkeys , non trained monkeys .
I've had an Ursus 385 , Zetor 8145 , and 12145 , and in all honesty , for what they cost to buy , and in repairs , I could not say one word against them .

There was two brothers around here like that too. One brother did all the tractor and field work and the other one never learned to drive a tractor. They had a Cyrstal too.
They were always buying bits of land so they had a very scattered farm. Silage time was a big affair back when I was starting to draw when I first got the license. There was lots of long draws involved so there was two outfits brought in to cut it. The farmer had a mb trac 1500 in drawing himself and to speed things up he put another 16 foot trailer behind so he could bring two loads each run. He was handy enough at the driving and had a good system set up with the teleporter to speed up hitching up.
Even with lots of trailers and a fairly modern harvester cutting there would always take four to five days. The farmer was incredibly rough and ready in a lot of ways. There was a few lads drawing that wouldnt give way to anything on the road even meeting full loads. The farmer told me that if I was coming along with a load that I should pull and wait whenever I was coming close to meeting a trailer coming in the opposite direction. I was wondering a bit about this until he told me to be sure and have the tractor in reverse and be ready to back the trailer into the empty one and teach the other lad a lesson. Before anything like this happened we all agreed to stick with the age old rule that the man with the load holds the road.
Fast forward to today and the first cut there is now put in in two days. Bigger tractors,harvestors and trailers have brought on the job a long way in the past twenty years. All of the tractors involved would have all been bought second hand. Their value combined wouldnt buy a new tractor and silage trailer for drawing in today.
 

Peter

Well-Known Member
I would have drawn silage with a 784, it had the lightning strike gearstick on the left and the trailer tipping lever on the right that you could catch with your heel easily. First day out with a full trailer and I got down to open a gate in front of me. Got back to tractor after catching the tipping lever accidentally with my big foot and the load was well up in the air, only reason it didnt lift the tractor was the back wheels were full of water for traction. That tractor was the only one in the outfit that could fly up a greasy hill no problem fully loaded. Plenty of power, stopping wasn't as good. It was fast though.

A local contractor has been wrapping bales with a 674 for the past 25 odd years. The left hand gear change was made more akward for him as he lost his left arm in an accident. He also had a hymac wheel digger for stacking the bales. I always reckoned that it was a big job to drive it with two hands never mind one. There was no third service on the valve chest for the loader so he plumbed it up to the valve chest for the backactor. So every time you wanted to open and close the grab you had to reach behind you.
 

MF30

Well-Known Member
A local contractor has been wrapping bales with a 674 for the past 25 odd years. The left hand gear change was made more akward for him as he lost his left arm in an accident. He also had a hymac wheel digger for stacking the bales. I always reckoned that it was a big job to drive it with two hands never mind one. There was no third service on the valve chest for the loader so he plumbed it up to the valve chest for the backactor. So every time you wanted to open and close the grab you had to reach behind you.
That poor man didn’t half mind suffering, did he.
 
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