AgOpenGPS

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
No, not been back playing with it. Had a huge project at work and when that was done I'd no interest in technical tinkering. Been working on the camper since the work thing went live.

I'm a man of many many projects.

Looks a good price on that board, the f9p seems to be the chip to go to. Was nothing that cheap last year but it was still relatively new at that stage
 

headcase

Very Senior Member
No, not been back playing with it. Had a huge project at work and when that was done I'd no interest in technical tinkering. Been working on the camper since the work thing went live.

I'm a man of many many projects.

Looks a good price on that board, the f9p seems to be the chip to go to. Was nothing that cheap last year but it was still relatively new at that stage
So if I had
2 of those chips (1 rover 1 base )
2 gps antennas (as above)
A tablet to run agopen
I think I need a cheap tablet to run the base station
Ardunio controller to run either a lightbar or steering valve or motor

I'm nearly there
What else?
 

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
The base and rover will need internet connections. I'd use a desktop for the base

If you want the lightbar only you're done with that list.

If you want auto steer you need a few more bits to determine steering angle, slope, heading etc and the pcb to join them together.

I had no plans to go that far so cant say for sure.

@towbar bought some pcb blanks, did you go any further yet?
 

headcase

Very Senior Member
The base and rover will need internet connections. I'd use a desktop for the base

If you want the lightbar only you're done with that list.

If you want auto steer you need a few more bits to determine steering angle, slope, heading etc and the pcb to join them together.

I had no plans to go that far so cant say for sure.

@towbar bought some pcb blanks, did you go any further yet?
im humming and haaaing to make a portable base station on 4g
 

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
@headcase read up on how the internet base stations work using the z9fp I'm under the impression they take quite a bit of time to zero themselves in, I don't think they're really intended to be moved too quickly.


@scoffcruddle how much ground do you need to cover? you can get private radio options for correction signals too, but the range isnt massive. 20km in theoretically perfect conditions (which don't exist) 8-10 in good flat ground with the base on a height.
 

headcase

Very Senior Member
@headcase read up on how the internet base stations work using the z9fp I'm under the impression they take quite a bit of time to zero themselves in, I don't think they're really intended to be moved too quickly.


@scoffcruddle how much ground do you need to cover? you can get private radio options for correction signals too, but the range isnt massive. 20km in theoretically perfect conditions (which don't exist) 8-10 in good flat ground with the base on a height.
I've seen on that f9p theres a hot start option which reduces time from 30+seconds to around 5🤷‍♂️
 

scoffcruddle

Well-Known Member
@headcase read up on how the internet base stations work using the z9fp I'm under the impression they take quite a bit of time to zero themselves in, I don't think they're really intended to be moved too quickly.


@scoffcruddle how much ground do you need to cover? you can get private radio options for correction signals too, but the range isnt massive. 20km in theoretically perfect conditions (which don't exist) 8-10 in good flat ground with the base on a height.
I need to cover 220 acres at home and 100 acres a mile down the road,trouble I’ve got is the terrain,it’s probably the worst there is,lots of trees,250’ altitude changes etc
 

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
@headcase That's for the rover.

But the base needs to sit in one spot logging its position for a while.

GPS is amazing tech but you are still relying on satellites that are 20k km away. Over time the signal drifts around a little bit.

What the base does is sits there in survey mode logging the drift for a while, eventually it has enough data points to say that it must actually be in the middle of them all.

Then you change to correction mode and it calculates the offset of the current position the GPS chip is seeing from that known position. Software then uploads that correction calculation to the internet.

Your device or software on the rover then downloads the correction calculation and applies it to the GPS position it sees giving you the rtk level of accuracy.

I don't know how long it takes to do that survey in portion but I understand it is hours at least.
 

headcase

Very Senior Member
@headcase That's for the rover.

But the base needs to sit in one spot logging its position for a while.

GPS is amazing tech but you are still relying on satellites that are 20k km away. Over time the signal drifts around a little bit.

What the base does is sits there in survey mode logging the drift for a while, eventually it has enough data points to say that it must actually be in the middle of them all.

Then you change to correction mode and it calculates the offset of the current position the GPS chip is seeing from that known position. Software then uploads that correction calculation to the internet.

Your device or software on the rover then downloads the correction calculation and applies it to the GPS position it sees giving you the rtk level of accuracy.

I don't know how long it takes to do that survey in portion but I understand it is hours at least.
Ahh ok👍
 
Top