Ash dieback

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
They should be cut down while the timber is still useful as firewood,once they rot much it's not worth cutting up
We have a lad coming in with a tree shear in early September. It's surprising at how fast they died. They were green last summer.
 
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JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
Jesus they're bad. Sadly I'm gearing up to cut a lot of them from the first of September but none as bad as pictured.

I've a few ill let stand another year because they're healthier and I love looking at Ash trees.

@diesel power importing saplings only brought it here a few years sooner, the rate it travelled from east to west across Europe it would have made its own way here 3 or 4 years after we had imported it anyway
 

Bog Man

Well-Known Member
Jesus they're bad. Sadly I'm gearing up to cut a lot of them from the first of September but none as bad as pictured.

I've a few ill let stand another year because they're healthier and I love looking at Ash trees.

@diesel power importing saplings only brought it here a few years sooner, the rate it travelled from east to west across Europe it would have made its own way here 3 or 4 years after we had imported it anyway
Was talking to a tree expert and he said it came from Eastern Europe and Russia and with the fall of communism and the accession to EU of the former soviet states it allowed it into Europe. He said no hardwood should ever be grown as a single species.
He was of the opinion that it could have been kept out but probably politically unacceptable.
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
Jesus they're bad. Sadly I'm gearing up to cut a lot of them from the first of September but none as bad as pictured.

I've a few ill let stand another year because they're healthier and I love looking at Ash trees.

@diesel power importing saplings only brought it here a few years sooner, the rate it travelled from east to west across Europe it would have made its own way here 3 or 4 years after we had imported it anyway
@JohnBoy, how is it that they all haven't succumbed to the die back considering its here a good while now and we are only 2 mile from where it was first discovered.
alot of them dead or dying but still a good share of Ash still OK
I know it's a daft notion but could it be down to the previous health or immunity of a tree which got the disease or not
 

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
Was talking to a tree expert and he said it came from Eastern Europe and Russia and with the fall of communism and the accession to EU of the former soviet states it allowed it into Europe. He said no hardwood should ever be grown as a single species.
He was of the opinion that it could have been kept out but probably politically unacceptable.
Spores blowing on the wind know nothing of communism or the EU
 

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
@JohnBoy, how is it that they all haven't succumbed to the die back considering its here a good while now and we are only 2 mile from where it was first discovered.
alot of them dead or dying but still a good share of Ash still OK
I know it's a daft notion but could it be down to the previous health or immunity of a tree which got the disease or not

That I don't understand.

We had it on the farm in a forestry plot, probably one of the original imports. dept thought I was imagining it until I found it in a hedgerow tree putting up bat boxes for glas, so seven years ago now and that tree is on the list that'll probably be left until next year, but others that were much further from the plantation are getting the chop.

Here at some there's a lot of ash around our boundary and while a few are obviously dieing back the "healthy" ones are thinner/lighter than they should be.

All we can do is take them down before they take something else out on the way down
 

Arthur

Well-Known Member
Spores blowing on the wind know nothing of communism or the EU
I have it in forestry, nothing in miles planted on the prevailing wind side, cant get a felling licence because of a total lack of joined up thinking in the dieback scheme, an exemption from planning needed which the council wont give because of a SAC (special area of conservation) despite having addressed these concerns in the felling licence application to forestry division with a environmental report and silt trap plans, replanting species et al at considerable expense.
 

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
I have it in forestry, nothing in miles planted on the prevailing wind side, cant get a felling licence because of a total lack of joined up thinking in the dieback scheme, an exemption from planning needed which the council wont give because of a SAC (special area of conservation) despite having addressed these concerns in the felling licence application to forestry division with a environmental report and silt trap plans, replanting species et al at considerable expense.
Lack of joined up thinking? From the Forest Service? Surely not!

Have had things come to a head with them this year over our former plot. Sick sh1t of them so I am.
 

Deutz fahr 165.7

Active Member
Have sawn up a few big trees that fell. They were never noticably infected. The went at the roots. When sawing I found the very centre to be black.
Could be the case here as well but the older ones are healthy out. Unless a storm knocks them I wouldn't touch them anyway. I had a beech tree on the farm my father told me it was at least 300 years old . Lighting bolt took a huge limb off it, the limb was like a tree, I'm hoping to burn it in a stove which I hope will save us money come the winter.
 
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