At the mart...

jay gatsby

Well-Known Member
There is quite a substantial market for commercial stock genetics in both Ireland and the UK. Id say that theres more commercial "show breeders" now than pedigree breeders. A doner cow can produce between 30 and 60 viable embryos in her lifetime so in the right hands, a heifer of this one's breeding could be quite valuable. She was well advertised before the sale and the buyer would have had her well checked out.
Thanks, I didn't realise that. Is there a lotnof emphasis on icbf figures then or do lads just follow back the bloodlines of both breeds
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Thanks, I didn't realise that. Is there a lotnof emphasis on icbf figures then or do lads just follow back the bloodlines of both breeds
Its a mix and match really depending on the breed. Some of the more muscle types wouldn't have great maternal scores. But on the other side, they'd have high terminal scores.

The big sellers yesterday were the limousins. They were all high scoring for maternal.

Some lads wouldn't be big fans of the star system. Its more down to them not understanding it than there being a serious flaw with the system. I see that the proposed new bdgp scheme for the new cap will have more of a focus on terminal indexes with a view to finishing cattle at a younger age. I can only say that the old bdgp scheme was good to us. We didn't try to cut corners by bringing in dairy bred animals but rather tried to breed all round better animals from the cows that we had. It brought big changes to the type of cows we have but also brought very positive changes to the quality of the animals going out the gate.
 

Bot.exe

Well-Known Member
Its a mix and match really depending on the breed. Some of the more muscle types wouldn't have great maternal scores. But on the other side, they'd have high terminal scores.

The big sellers yesterday were the limousins. They were all high scoring for maternal.

Some lads wouldn't be big fans of the star system. Its more down to them not understanding it than there being a serious flaw with the system. I see that the proposed new bdgp scheme for the new cap will have more of a focus on terminal indexes with a view to finishing cattle at a younger age. I can only say that the old bdgp scheme was good to us. We didn't try to cut corners by bringing in dairy bred animals but rather tried to breed all round better animals from the cows that we had. It brought big changes to the type of cows we have but also brought very positive changes to the quality of the animals going out the gate.
There are many legacy issues with the star system, mostly around reliability and the lack of data on non Irish bulls. Not an issue for your average farmer but it's not a perfect system at all
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
Heard a thing or 2 today about them auctions.wouldnt be just enamoured by the setup going by a sale that took place last spring....
Can't beat the proper sales ring , animal paid for before it leaves the mart and seller gets his money in a few days.

Most of those sales are organised by marts and follow the same process, they are all regulated by the PRSA anyway. Like it or not online auctions are here to stay.
The Angus bonus sure.

Won't be got on P grades or O-.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Confidence must be low enough even in medium term beef prices? Watched a few marts online this week and there is a definite line in the sand - stores - anything over 550kg is selling very well with strong prices in excess of €2.55/kg. Anything under 550kg isn't a whole lot better than prices last year when we had a beef price that was near 70c/kg lower than today's prices.

The only exception is aa cattle. Anything 450kg or more is flying. I expect its because of the increased bonus announced in recent weeks.

All cull cows are strong enough from the thinnest to the fattest.
 
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jf 850

Well-Known Member
Confidence must be low enough even in medium term beef prices? Watched a few marts online this week and there is a definite line in the sand - stores - anything over 550kg is selling very well with strong prices in excess of €2.55/kg. Anything under 550kg isn't a whole lot better than prices last year when we had a beef price that was near 70c/kg lower than today's prices.

The only exception is as cattle. Anything 450kg or more is flying. I expect its because of the increased bonus announced in recent weeks.

All cull cows are strong enough from the thinnest to the fattest.

I saw 2 very plain AA heifers in Roscrea on Friday . April 20s . 520 kg make 1220 . I thought it very strong money , for what they were .

I sold some FR cull cows E1290, decent cow, 690 kg, back to E730 , for a 520 kg narrow spotty greyhound...
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
I saw 2 very plain AA heifers in Roscrea on Friday . April 20s . 520 kg make 1220 . I thought it very strong money , for what they were .

I sold some FR cull cows E1290, decent cow, 690 kg, back to E730 , for a 520 kg narrow spotty greyhound...
Bloody spell check. The exception is aa. Was watching a flitten of aa heifers go through the local mart yesterday and they out performed the charolais heifers of similar weights.
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
Confidence must be low enough even in medium term beef prices? Watched a few marts online this week and there is a definite line in the sand - stores - anything over 550kg is selling very well with strong prices in excess of €2.55/kg. Anything under 550kg isn't a whole lot better than prices last year when we had a beef price that was near 70c/kg lower than today's prices.

The only exception is aa cattle. Anything 450kg or more is flying. I expect its because of the increased bonus announced in recent weeks.

All cull cows are strong enough from the thinnest to the fattest.
Has been the same for all the last backend, things havent changed. Stores have strengthened some what.
 

lough

Well-Known Member
Confidence must be low enough even in medium term beef prices? Watched a few marts online this week and there is a definite line in the sand - stores - anything over 550kg is selling very well with strong prices in excess of €2.55/kg. Anything under 550kg isn't a whole lot better than prices last year when we had a beef price that was near 70c/kg lower than today's prices.

The only exception is aa cattle. Anything 450kg or more is flying. I expect its because of the increased bonus announced in recent weeks.

All cull cows are strong enough from the thinnest to the fattest.
I would say the high price of fertiliser is causing it, these animals will needs to be fed all summer and fed silage during the winter, there could be low prices for a while, there could be a lot of cows culled and a lot less calves born, which will cause a shortage, it could be a good time to buy
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
I would say the high price of fertiliser is causing it, these animals will needs to be fed all summer and fed silage during the winter, there could be low prices for a while, there could be a lot of cows culled and a lot less calves born, which will cause a shortage, it could be a good time to buy
Thats my thinking on it too. Around here I can't see anyone that buys stock buying any fertilizer. They will just reduce purchase numbers accordingly.
 

Mick mcquaid

Well-Known Member
I decided to try a couple of Simmental a.I straws on Friesian cows last year.Some nice calves out of them now.What would they be worth say 2-3 weeks old.simXfr
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
I decided to try a couple of Simmental a.I straws on Friesian cows last year.Some nice calves out of them now.What would they be worth say 2-3 weeks old.simXfr

I have bought a couple for the kids for the last 2 years for the kids. heifers @ €250. Made a mistake the first year - one of them was off a holstein and the difference between her and the one of a British Friesian is very noticeable.
 

Danube

Well-Known Member
I have bought a couple for the kids for the last 2 years for the kids. heifers @ €250. Made a mistake the first year - one of them was off a holstein and the difference between her and the one of a British Friesian is very noticeable.
Did you keep any for breeding?
 

Nashty

Well-Known Member
Dont, my aul lad did this, and while they are lovely quiet sucklers with lots of milk, the colour of their progeny makes them a hard sell regardless of what breed of bull is used
 

jf 850

Well-Known Member
That's good to hear. Hopefully they keep up for Saturday.

I got € 2 a kg for a good Fr cull cow last week . I also got €1.30 kg for a thin Spotty greyhound ..
Heavy Continental cows were making mad money .

I watched it online for 2 or 3 lots today .
I thought that cows had cooled a little versus last week ? Still OK money .

Smaller numbers than last week.

I had 2 470 kg LM bullocks out if FR cows , late March 20s . Turned into €1150 each .
 

Danube

Well-Known Member
The kids kept one off a BF cow - a nice square heifer. Will cross with limousin bull and whatever comes would make a good cow. I'm not a fan of first generation freisian for suckler breeding - they will always be narrow boned, but its an interest for the kids.
Yes I agree. If you can sneak a bit of blue breeding into the second or even third cross they produce cracking calves and the cows have lots of milk.
 

Danube

Well-Known Member
Dont, my aul lad did this, and while they are lovely quiet sucklers with lots of milk, the colour of their progeny makes them a hard sell regardless of what breed of bull is used
My dad ended up with an old simmental friesian cow a good many years ago. Mainly because we only had sheep at the time and mam grew up on a dairy farm and she was dying for a cow. That cow was crossed to a blue. Super calves. We kept a heifer out of her and she was an unreal cow to breed big shapey weanlings. (Sorry for the long backstory)
 
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