Beet harvesters

headcase

Very Senior Member
Right thinking to take my beet lifting in house
Looking for a single or twin row
Not overly impressed with the top lifters that currently lift mine
(weather that's setting or what I dont know)
No stones on my place so wont mind a bottom lifter

What's about?
Theyrgod
Tim
Juko
Cheaper the better but still useable
 

btd-6

Well-Known Member
But still useable 🙈
You can't lose really as tractor alone will be an appreciating asset with just 3k hours.. Quite believable too if it's been sat on there all it's life. .. I had one many moons ago. Mine had a 3000 unit and was a nice simple machine that you can fix yourself. I remember when opening up a field you used to pull L/H side front axle out so it ran between rows.. Shut it back in once opened out so the front wheel then ran in groove where beet had been to aid steering down row.... I guess nobody would want to sit on one nowadays as everyone spoilt with heaters, radios, q cabs and air con... Oh and lets not forget.. phone charging sockets !... :rolleyes:
 
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nashmach

Well-Known Member
Any opinions on the trailed harvesters?

What sold in your locality?

Have you ever operated one before? Everyone will tell you that they are the hardest machine to operate (Armer now mind you) and you either have it or don't have it with them.
 

headcase

Very Senior Member
What sold in your locality?

Have you ever operated one before? Everyone will tell you that they are the hardest machine to operate (Armer now mind you) and you either have it or don't have it with them.
Theres nothing sold locally
And only top lifters in 25mile of here as far as I know
 

Win

Well-Known Member
Any opinions on the trailed harvesters?
A guy i do work for bought a standen last year, first time out was difficult to say the least. I soon realised there's more to it than you think, nothing wrong with the harvester as such just the fact it was for sugar and not fodder. The rows were quite gappy last year which didn't help, you have them boot shaped things with the knife on (scalper??) that would drop down in a gap then come to the next beet and it would knock it over and that would be the start of it blocking, i suppose the fact the beet is on the ground rather than in it is the cause of that. It didn't seem to like slopes much either, you could run out of travel on the drawbar to keep it in work, almost wants a steering axle to help keep it square. No doubt it would be quite capable of doing it better but needs modifications to do so. There's another guy who has a three row TIM but haven't seen that working or heard anything about it so can't say.
 

btd-6

Well-Known Member
A guy i do work for bought a standen last year, first time out was difficult to say the least. I soon realised there's more to it than you think, nothing wrong with the harvester as such just the fact it was for sugar and not fodder. The rows were quite gappy last year which didn't help, you have them boot shaped things with the knife on (scalper??) that would drop down in a gap then come to the next beet and it would knock it over and that would be the start of it blocking, i suppose the fact the beet is on the ground rather than in it is the cause of that. It didn't seem to like slopes much either, you could run out of travel on the drawbar to keep it in work, almost wants a steering axle to help keep it square. No doubt it would be quite capable of doing it better but needs modifications to do so. There's another guy who has a three row TIM but haven't seen that working or heard anything about it so can't say.
On my Standen machines we lifted the feeler wheel / scalper units out of work with the softer fodder beet varieties that grew out of ground, and just use pre topper with a stubble and crown left on the roots. With higher dry matter varieties you could use scalper units as intended.

It's same with the Vervaet we have now just lift scalpers out of work. Even with sugar beet nowadays there's no need to crown the roots as BS now pay for them.

The last Standen we had was a Turbo four. This had a hydraulic draw-bar that you could push over with tractor spool valve so help on hillsides and around corners.
 
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Win

Well-Known Member
On my Standen machines we lifted the feeler wheel / scalper units out of work with the softer fodder beet varieties that grew out of ground, and just use pre topper with a stubble and crown left on the roots. With higher dry matter varieties you could use scalper units as intended.

It's same with the Vervaet we have now just lift scalpers out of work. Even with sugar beet nowadays there's no need to crown the roots as BS now pay for them
Is the Vervaet walking shoe type?
 

btd-6

Well-Known Member
@Win , I'd advise your Standen man if he isn't already doing so to make sure once the field is opened up to adjust the machines wheels so they run in the grooves where the beets were. This really helps to keep in the row along with precise tracking and stability even on banks. OTOH if you leave them in opening out position (between rows) they slip and slide all over and drop sideways into the grooves..
 
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john415

Well-Known Member
no way is it worth the hardship.how many acres. we only have 10 ac i wouldnt lift it if i got a harvester for free.lad came 3 different times to pull throughout the season 110 an ac.
 

headcase

Very Senior Member
no way is it worth the hardship.how many acres. we only have 10 ac i wouldnt lift it if i got a harvester for free.lad came 3 different times to pull throughout the season 110 an ac.
My current thinking but getting them back when its dry or im out is hard
 
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btd-6

Well-Known Member
I take it they're better than opal wheels, faster forward speed??
Yes they're much better in heavy land as they gently coax the beet out with no clods, and wear quite well with the addition of tungsten carbide. These shares with the vibrating action never limit your forward speed and have rotary paddles taking the beet from them. Forward speed is only limited by sheer volume of beet up the machine along with types of land with cleaning and separation like any other machine.

Opal wheels are ok but we found they could block up between spokes in heavy sticky land and could create clods unless run extremely light. Simple straightforward design though.
 

Wexfman

Well-Known Member
I often thought of fabricating a oppel wheel frame for the single row armer salmon. I’ve had Thyregods for 30 years so I have most of the bits required. Getting the spare time for these mad ideas is the problem
 

headcase

Very Senior Member
I often thought of fabricating a oppel wheel frame for the single row armer salmon. I’ve had Thyregods for 30 years so I have most of the bits required. Getting the spare time for these mad ideas is the problem
what are the theyregods like for running?
 

Wexfman

Well-Known Member
They’re not too bad. Finding a good one these days is difficult though. Parts are very extensive but they’re a good machine. More suited to sugar beet that fodder beet
 

Danielk

Well-Known Member
They’re not too bad. Finding a good one these days is difficult though. Parts are very extensive but they’re a good machine. More suited to sugar beet that fodder beet
Why more suited to sugar beet? Is it because the beet is more in the ground? There were a few of them around years ago but only know of one now.
 

Wexfman

Well-Known Member
Why more suited to sugar beet? Is it because the beet is more in the ground? There were a few of them around years ago but only know of one now.
Yes the beet are more in the ground and are shaped better to suit the oppel wheels
 
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