Daily weather forecast update

February’18 wasn’t too bad IIRC but March and April were terrible rained non stop. Dried up then and hardly rained again till September.
I think I remember it dried up nearly overnight that spring. It turned very hash if memory serves. All the talk was of nothing going to be sown before May and a week later spring crops were in land dried so quickly.
 
I think I remember it dried up nearly overnight that spring. It turned very hash if memory serves. All the talk was of nothing going to be sown before May and a week later spring crops were in land dried so quickly.
I’ve seen lads on here put up posts on a Sunday in March telling us that land is so wet it will take three weeks to dry before any work could be done and then put up pictures of themselves ploughing on the following Wednesday.
It’s amazing what happens in springtime.
 
In 2018, February was cold and harsh with easterly wind. I remember showing some UK people the oilseed rape plots here.

Within a week or two, Storm Emma arrived dumping a lot of snow along the south. Drifts around here were over 1m high.
It then melted and left everything very wet. Nothing was sown here before the end of April. I remember looking at the rainfall figures in late April as the rain continued to fall. I said to myself that we must be due a very dry spell at some point during the year.
Barley sown in May saw very little rain until harvest. Winter crops did well enough but a good spring barley crop was 2.8tn.
We ploughed some ground at the end of May and there was a fog coming off the freshly ploughed fields as they had so much moisture in them.

There was a severe fodder crisis that summer with dairy farmers actually in tears in front of their Teagasc adviser. 2017 had been a great dairy year and income tax fell due along with the fodder crisis.
The government created a fodder scheme where tillage farmers planted fodder crops after harvest to relieve the pressure on farms. We put chains and locks on the gates of an outside farm as the risk of bales being stolen was very real. Grain and straw prices were very good so winter crops in particular were very profitable.
 
It's very confusing looking at the forecast from next weekend on. It always is but atm models are splitting every way. Some have high pressure coming in Saturday and even heading north. Others have Low pressure from the north west coming back after the weekend . So it's real spring weather forecast on some and cold wet slushy weather from Greenland on others.
 
18’ was an odd spring, beast from the east, then very wet then very dry
It started raining on the 9th of July 2017 and finally stopped raining the June bank holiday wkend in 2018 and dried into a drought,it was October before we got any worth while rain here.
April and May of 18 were a washout.
This photo was taken on the 17th April 18
 

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It started raining on the 9th of July 2017 and finally stopped raining the June bank holiday wkend in 2018 and dried into a drought,it was October before we got any worth while rain here.
April and May of 18 were a washout.
This photo was taken on the 17th April 18
It’s like that again @jpt when you consider it did same from July last year, have 2 paddocks exactly like that here now
 
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In 2018, February was cold and harsh with easterly wind. I remember showing some UK people the oilseed rape plots here.

Within a week or two, Storm Emma arrived dumping a lot of snow along the south. Drifts around here were over 1m high.
It then melted and left everything very wet. Nothing was sown here before the end of April. I remember looking at the rainfall figures in late April as the rain continued to fall. I said to myself that we must be due a very dry spell at some point during the year.
Barley sown in May saw very little rain until harvest. Winter crops did well enough but a good spring barley crop was 2.8tn.
We ploughed some ground at the end of May and there was a fog coming off the freshly ploughed fields as they had so much moisture in them.

There was a severe fodder crisis that summer with dairy farmers actually in tears in front of their Teagasc adviser. 2017 had been a great dairy year and income tax fell due along with the fodder crisis.
The government created a fodder scheme where tillage farmers planted fodder crops after harvest to relieve the pressure on farms. We put chains and locks on the gates of an outside farm as the risk of bales being stolen was very real. Grain and straw prices were very good so winter crops in particular were very profitable.
Winter barley was the only crop here with a respectable yield in 2018. Winter wheat did 8.1 t/ha and winter oats did 5.2t/ha. Our lighter soils ran out of moisture in June before the end of grain fill. The less said about Spring crops the better.
 
windscreen was well frozen this morning, between that and a red sky this morning wouldn't be wonderful.
see there's still bits of snow on the mountain in places from last week which isn't just what you'd be hoping for.
@Scruffy91
Ye I see there’s still a good bit on cuilcagh alright, they say it takes more to bring it off the mountain. It’s not effecting me as much since I emigrated to Leitrim’s lowlands
 
Lads ploughing around here, think I'd be waiting another few days but rest of the week to be wet.
 
Lots of rain forecast for this week, I'm still holding on, early enough yet, I would like to have it done before the end of the month.
I don't have anything even sprayed off and judging by the water laying in tramlines on the lower ground I won't be doing anything for a while. I'm not worried or anything yet. Land here is heavy compared to a lot of others and doesn't forgive getting mauled. About mid April is when I'll be getting a bit worked up when I see ye all sowing away mad.
 
One of the times when you're better off not looking at the charts. A few pet days and potentially a storm the middle of next week. This February is dragging on to be a write off of a month.
 
Sure it's only by good luck now and again we get good weather. Look at where we are positioned on a map & a big ocean out to our West. Pure luck upon occasion. Expect nathing & you'll get the odd surprise.
 
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