Dosing

Discussion in 'Stock Talk' started by muckymanor, Nov 15, 2016.

  1. ithastopay

    ithastopay Well-Known Member

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    It worked no bother, made the job easier here.
     
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  2. Eoin Fenton

    Eoin Fenton Well-Known Member

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    If they have lice will clipping strip off backs suffice or would they need pour on too. Have hairy ones so would need to be clipped pre pour on I would think
     
  3. Arthur

    Arthur Well-Known Member

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    These lads were clipped and treated before housing, seems to be a problem for me every year about 6-7 weeks into housing.
     
  4. Eoin Fenton

    Eoin Fenton Well-Known Member

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    I think this is peak time for lice. Dirty old thing and no thrive either
     
  5. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    I thought it was just us that have the same experience each year.

    I can even track it across the groups as they were done here, seems to be the eight week mark pretty much spot on.
     
  6. Peter

    Peter Well-Known Member

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    I was off a discussion group meeting today and we had a vet in giving us a talk. Anyway he was talking about dosing methods and he was telling us that tests done on worm pour ons showed that it was impossible for it to penetrate the skin and must only work if the cattle lick it off each others backs. He also talked about taking dung samples for testing to find out what they really need and not be under or over dosing.
    This year I injected all the cattle for fluke and worms and I think it made a difference. For next year I'm going to take silage shite and soil samples and not be relying on guesswork.
     
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  7. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    I won't use pourons
    I really dont like them,injectables all the way for me
     
  8. Carrigogunnell

    Carrigogunnell Well-Known Member

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    Had one to before christmas as its mandatory to do a herd health plan for the dicussion gruop. He mentioned the exact same about majority of it being taking in orally through licking each other.
     
  9. muckymanor

    muckymanor Well-Known Member

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    Vet at our discussion group had the exact same tale. He advised that a dose was the best and cheapest thing. That's why I started this thread. Dosed for rumen fluke in the cows this year and all of the young cattle got separate worm and fluke doses on the 1 day. Very pleased with the results To be honest, the easiest way to treat an animal is with the dosing hook - especially the cows.
     
  10. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    Cheapest is injection
     
  11. muckymanor

    muckymanor Well-Known Member

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    Which one?

    When I did up my figures, my younger cattle got 2 separate doses which cost a total of €1.30. Giving them a single closamectin injection for the same thing would have cost €2.50. Also I find it as easy to dose with the hook as to inject.
     
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  12. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    I use bimectin+ works out about £1.10a beast depending on size
     
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  13. muckymanor

    muckymanor Well-Known Member

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    Ah, I had looked at that, but It only covered adult fluke. It was coming in at €1.50 for a 400kg animal. I see it has come down in price recently.
     
  14. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    My beast been in for months now so only adult fluke

    Local stores has a bit of a offer on at the mo
     
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  15. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    £160 for 1250ml of bimectin+
    7.8p per ml so a 500kg beast is 78p,if my head is working properly this morning
     
  16. muckymanor

    muckymanor Well-Known Member

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    So it's that time again. We dosed the store cattle this week for worms. In honesty, we used the leftover of what we dosed them with before they were housed. It worked well when they were housed. They did ok in the shed and they have thrived very well since they got out.

    So we are planning on a dosing regime every 5 to 6 weeks. In honesty it's a lot of work - Impossible for me to do on my own and quite difficult with only the Mrs for help.
    Is there any other option for a treatment that will work for a longer period of time?
     
  17. Agrivator

    Agrivator Active Member

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    Abstract

    Four controlled studies, one each in Australia, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States, involving 30 calves each were conducted to evaluate the effect of simulated rainfall on the efficacy of Ivomec Pour-On against infections of Cooperia spp. At 3 weeks before treatment the calves were infected orally with third-stage larvae of Cooperia spp. In each study a recent, locally derived field isolate was used. The calves were allocated by restricted randomization based on body weight within sex to one of the following treatments: unmedicated control with no rain, Ivomec Pour-On with no rain, Ivomec Pour-On with rain starting at 40 min before treatment, Ivomec Pour-On with rain starting at 10 min after treatment, and Ivomec Pour-On with rain starting at 60 min after treatment. Ivomec Pour-On was applied topically at a dose rate of 1 ml/10 kg body weight (500 microg ivermectin/kg body weight). The simulated rainfall was equivalent to a heavy shower of approximately 12.5 mm of water during a 30-min period. The calves were necropsied for worm counting at 14 or 15 days after treatment. An evaluation of the pooled data showed that as compared with the untreated controls, the Ivomec Pour-On-treated calves with no rain had significantly (P < 0.01) fewer C. oncophora (> 99%), C. punctata (> 99%), C. surnabada (> 98%), and combined Cooperia spp. (> 99%). The reduction in Cooperia numbers noted for calves exposed to simulated rainfall was > 96% for all Cooperia species, regardless of when the rainfall started relative to the application of Ivomec Pour-On. There was no significant (P > 0.1) difference between the Ivomec Pour-On-treated calves with no rain and the pooled groups with simulated rainfall or between the group with rain before treatment and the pooled groups with rain after treatment. Ivomec Pour-On was highly effective against established infections of Cooperia spp. when applied to wet animals or to animals becoming wet shortly after treatment.
     
  18. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    @muckymanor im going to try and do FEC egg counts this year. Find out if there is a need to dose instead of blanket approach. Must go price up what I need to do it
     
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  19. Stick2YourGuns

    Stick2YourGuns Member

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    Paper never refuses ink! That abstract above is a classic case of the Pharmaceutical companies doing their own studies and altering results to an extend to suit themselves so let the buyer be ware. That said, Ivomec has probably single been handily the best veterinary product of the past 25 years. It has been tried and trusted. The injection is without doubt a better option than pour on. But where do the parasites live? In the intestines (gut) and stomach, therefore a good oral dose will kill the majority of the worm burden but note. Do not mast treat animals pre turn out, only after 6-7 weeks at grazing. They need to pick up a certain level of worms so that their body recognises the parasite the next time they pick them up and have a decent level of tolerance against them. Otherwise if you treat them all before turn out the worms "think" that there's something trying to destroy their existence entirely and can't complete their life cycle. This leads to them alternated their evolution and then in 10 years time or less, they are resistant to the product. Therefore alter the product used every 2 years and also do FEC to see what worms the land has. Then ask your vet what the best product they have. A classic example is where farmers pre treated calves going out with Ivomec (contract reared dairy calves) and then the following year as heifers ready to bull the worm burden they picked up affected them much much more as they never had experience for the worms in their body and couldn't fight it
     
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  20. Peter

    Peter Well-Known Member

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    I injected half the herd of cattle here aswell today with noromecten. Its a great chance to have a good look at them when their in the crush. I do pay my neighbour to come over and help me whenever im doing anything like that with cattle. Its money well spent imo.
     
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  21. Arthur

    Arthur Well-Known Member

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    Used the standard Bimectin on all the yearlings today, don't have a fluke problem so no need for the +version this early in the season.
     
  22. Arthur

    Arthur Well-Known Member

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    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/env...-cow-pats-for-precious-dung-beetles-1.4264787
     
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  23. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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  24. WestCorkBoy

    WestCorkBoy Well-Known Member

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    Do you test or just visually assess what needs dosing?
     
  25. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    Mostly visually assess with some profiling done aswell. As in young slip feeding cows from our region will more than likely need a fluke dose
     

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