Factory Prices General thread

marco

Well-Known Member
When we went to school we were thought about the carbon cycle. Doesn't seem to apply to this debate. If a vegetable takes carbon out of the air that's good, if a cow eats grass and clover that also took carbon out of the air that's bad. Propaganda, that's all it is.
 

gone

Well-Known Member
We're getting side tracked here, nobody is addressing the Franco/Hiberno price differences.
This is as it always will be, France is a meat importing nation with an affinity for it's farmers, so French meat is worth more, Ireland exports near 90% of it's beef and the main market has been disrupted so it's beef price is lower.
Nothing that surprising there.
 

gone

Well-Known Member
Stocking rates are far more intense now, that's a given, particularly so dairy cows.
There are not more ruminant animals on the planet, in fact there are significantly less than at many periods in the last 10,000 years.
The fact that the number of herds of ruminants has dropped faster than the size of the herds have risen is of no consequence to global warming.
 
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gone

Well-Known Member
If you had a drafty house, with a pane of glass broke and a hole in the roof, more is getting out the hole in the roof, but the glass is still an issue. You didn't notice the glass cracked first because your fire was able to compensate. Now you have both, you have a problem. This is our scenario now with glass cracked being methane and the hole in the roof being co2.

Now we have both we have to fix at least one one, so primarily we should tackle the hole in the roof, but it doesn't mean the hole in the window isn't an issue any more. By making small patches to the hole in the window (AD) and fixing the hole in the roof outright (co2 reidction through whatever means you like), we're now better off than before.
This is a perfect analogy.
Yes we have a draughty house and comparing ruminants methane production to a cracked pane of glass is a very good comparison, a non issue when you have a hole in your roof.
The glass has been cracked since you moved into the house and isn't getting any bigger, it did not cause a draught when the roof was intact and will not again if the roof is fixed.
Meanwhile the buckos from big business are still on the roof striping it for the lead and every now and again one of them shouts down through the hole they are making , "get that window fixed, it is destroying your house".
 
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WestCorkBoy

Well-Known Member
Alright then lets go there, even if you are ruining my evening and destroying my faith in 3rd level education.
The Methane emissions from ruminant animals is basically the same as it was 10 years ago, 50yrs ago, 100yrs ago, 500yrs ago, 1,000yrs ago and 5,000yrs ago, but suddenly it is what is causing all the issues, give me a break.
Methane is not 28 times more warming than CO2, again this is just a trope sold to you by big business, methane is short lived and breaks down and over it's life is only marginally more warming than CO2 and ruminants are not adding extra Methane to our atmosphere they are only releasing similar amounts as are breaking down from previously released methane.
Grass is Ireland's biggest carbon sink.
Grass is Ireland's biggest producer of Oxygen.
Grass is Ireland's biggest digestor of CO2.
Farming is not the Issue, but having to write this has F#€£€D me right off, I need a drink as I am so depressed for the future, J.H.C. it is not rocket science, global warming only started when we started to dig up 3.5 Billion years of Carbon and burnt it, how can anyone not get this ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
The EPA, and the climate council are very much in agreement with you on principal, Miles Allen an Oxford/Cambridge professor ( can't remember which) has been pushing the fact it's only the net change in cattle numbers makes any difference for a few years, there is a growing acceptance of it in officaldom. But international accounting practice hasn't caught up yet. the farmers journal actually did a really good webinar on it, it's worth a listen as these are the people shaping policy.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member

Anyway, anyone anything solid for next week? Plenty of short weeks coming up now.
380 next week again was the price given when I killed earlier this week.

A friend works between 2 marts and says that factory agents are back buying strong in both marts in the last week.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
There's €3.90 to be got later this week if you are able to supply in bigger numbers and €3.85 if you are not. It is being reflected in mart prices for the last 2 weeks too with heavier stores and dry cows moving up in price bit by bit.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Must be a huge difference between the north and the south of the country we are 10c behind those prices. But the same story that things might move on late in the week.
That's what came in the text this afternoon. Lads would have reported quotes back that they received for this week and the advisor sends them out on a Monday afternoon (usually). There would be quotes from 4 or 5 different factories that I am aware of (Galway, Roscommon, Tipperary, Westmeath, Mayo).
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
Must be a huge difference between the north and the south of the country we are 10c behind those prices. But the same story that things might move on late in the week.
That's what came in the text this afternoon. Lads would have reported quotes back that they received for this week and the advisor sends them out on a Monday afternoon (usually). There would be quotes from 4 or 5 different factories that I am aware of (Galway, Roscommon, Tipperary, Westmeath, Mayo).
Thats an interesting way of working it @muckymanor, at least your guaranteed realistic prices. As @WestCorkBoy says for the last year in the Southern part of the country we seem to be running up to 10c behind at times. Makes you wonder when you see carcases from the Northwest of the country been traded with Factories in the South for further cutting
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Thats an interesting way of working it @muckymanor, at least your guaranteed realistic prices. As @WestCorkBoy says for the last year in the Southern part of the country we seem to be running up to 10c behind at times. Makes you wonder when you see carcases from the Northwest of the country been traded with Factories in the South for further cutting
Its the remnants of an old discussion group that we were part of with a private planner. He had another few groups and a few colleagues that had groups. If you get a factory quote you text it in and you get a weekly update on prices. Good way for the planner to keep in touch with clients too at little cost.
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
Took 5 in on Friday and they averaged £1150 a piece,so £5754 paid into the bank,have another 5 good culls earmarked also.
My decision to drop cow numbers a bit,isn’t hard when there making good money.
what price are you getting, they must have some serious feeding in them
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Ashbourne Meats in Roscrea is the only place for him, they kill a lot of stock bulls on a certain day or maybe 2 days per month. Try get a quote from them, either that or hit for the mart with him.
Willie McCormack is the lad to ask for when you call them.
 
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