Farm Machinery Hire

TAFKAT

Well-Known Member
Pardon my ignorance but how does the NRF work if you're feeding away from where you open the bales? I'd have a couple of customers who would be outwintering cattle, they take the plastic off in the yard and then take the net off at the round feeder, taking the whole lot off at that point wouldn't be simple.
 

Deerehunter

Well-Known Member
The lads who baled for him had some extra long wrap rolls from somewhere, said it made it a far better job as standard wraps didn't last long enough
Some of the extra long wraps are lighter gauge plastic can be easier to tear. Used volac long rolls here about 10 years ago and i was hopping on and off the tractor every second bale. I was well pissed off by time i had those rolls finished. I think they were 2000m while standard ate 1500m. If the plastic were same gauge id definetly try the long rolls again.the standard rolls will need to be changed after approx 120 bales at 3 wraps.
 

Deerehunter

Well-Known Member
Pardon my ignorance but how does the NRF work if you're feeding away from where you open the bales? I'd have a couple of customers who would be outwintering cattle, they take the plastic off in the yard and then take the net off at the round feeder, taking the whole lot off at that point wouldn't be simple.
I cut all the plastic at feeder.
 

c4l

Well-Known Member
Pardon my ignorance but how does the NRF work if you're feeding away from where you open the bales? I'd have a couple of customers who would be outwintering cattle, they take the plastic off in the yard and then take the net off at the round feeder, taking the whole lot off at that point wouldn't be simple.
Cut the face of the outer layers, grab the inside of the plastic and stretch it out a bit and cut along the barrel then I'm assuming. Don't have to go all serial killer on the bale
 

drew

Well-Known Member
Pardon my ignorance but how does the NRF work if you're feeding away from where you open the bales? I'd have a couple of customers who would be outwintering cattle, they take the plastic off in the yard and then take the net off at the round feeder, taking the whole lot off at that point wouldn't be simple.
Cut the 2 ends off in the yard then just slice the barrel the same as you would a net wrap bale at the feeder I guess would be the only way?

It’s something I think I’d go for in the morning (5600 mchales can do it if kitted out for it) if I could but don’t see it working well with a standard trailed wrapper, I think you’d need an inline wrapper type with a cradle arm.
 

Bot.exe

Well-Known Member
Pardon my ignorance but how does the NRF work if you're feeding away from where you open the bales? I'd have a couple of customers who would be outwintering cattle, they take the plastic off in the yard and then take the net off at the round feeder, taking the whole lot off at that point wouldn't be simple.
How much net do you put on? I wouldn't travel far with the plastic off myself and they get 2.2 rounds of net
 

CavanJacks

Well-Known Member
Lads if ye were having mouldy bales with net & wrap that it was a problem ye mustn't off being putting on enough wrap & or using poor quailty plastic & or damaging your bales in transit.

One lad who's using new fusion made bales with the wrap,told me he spent hours looking for the start of the net on bales. I told him maybe he needs glasses.

Father phil said recently "it's not how much you can make,its how much you can save" at a euro extra a bale it flys in the face of such.

Could never see any problems with net from a farmer's perspective. (Suppose it keeps the contractor in debt & lament buying these new balers.the only way they'd have it)
 

Masseyrk662

Well-Known Member
there’s a lad we do a small bit of sowing and spraying for with the nickname “old Trafford” a bit of tillage, a few sheep, a few cows, a few dry cattle and a couple of ridges of potatoes. Everything he does in the yard is exceptionally clean and to perfect standard. He does his own baling with a krone 130 chopper model. He puts on 16 wraps to his TWINE bales with his Roco wrapper if anyone remembers them and draws them back to the yard one by one himself with a massey 699, every year he has silage like it was fermented in a lab, there isn’t a white or blue spot on any bale ever only good quality silage. He would be making 500 of these silage bales a year for himself and I asked him one day how he manages to have every bale waste free, he told me there’s 2 key steps: the first “don’t cut sh1te” the 2nd “mind the bales after they are made” I think these are 2 things a lot of people forget about
 

c4l

Well-Known Member
there’s a lad we do a small bit of sowing and spraying for with the nickname “old Trafford” a bit of tillage, a few sheep, a few cows, a few dry cattle and a couple of ridges of potatoes. Everything he does in the yard is exceptionally clean and to perfect standard. He does his own baling with a krone 130 chopper model. He puts on 16 wraps to his TWINE bales with his Roco wrapper if anyone remembers them and draws them back to the yard one by one himself with a massey 699, every year he has silage like it was fermented in a lab, there isn’t a white or blue spot on any bale ever only good quality silage. He would be making 500 of these silage bales a year for himself and I asked him one day how he manages to have every bale waste free, he told me there’s 2 key steps: the first “don’t cut sh1te” the 2nd “mind the bales after they are made” I think these are 2 things a lot of people forget about
would agree on mind the bales after the wrap. my old man is a great advocate for wrapping bales in the yard (much to my annoyance due to the amount of time taken) but you are pretty much cutting down the amount of opportunities a bales can get a hole in the wrap when wrapping in the yard. only handling the wrapped bale once. also not dealing with with trailers that invite tearing and holes being created by over hanging branches and briars on roads and laneways. all thats needed to do is a bit of grease on top of the bales
 

AYF

Well-Known Member
Lads if ye were having mouldy bales with net & wrap that it was a problem ye mustn't off being putting on enough wrap & or using poor quailty plastic & or damaging your bales in transit.

One lad who's using new fusion made bales with the wrap,told me he spent hours looking for the start of the net on bales. I told him maybe he needs glasses.

Father phil said recently "it's not how much you can make,its how much you can save" at a euro extra a bale it flys in the face of such.

Could never see any problems with net from a farmer's perspective. (Suppose it keeps the contractor in debt & lament buying these new balers.the only way they'd have it)
We found a bale with a bit of a rip in the black wrap last winter.
Dad saw the white and though 'gosh look at that mould'.... turns out it was the white of the mc hale wrap! Wasn't a drop of mould on it.

We used to use extra wrap, now we don't, so a bale comes to much the same price.

Easier feeding out with no ffaffing sorting the net helps a lot too.


As for feeding out.
We cut one end.
Stand on that end, then one slice through the whole lot and it comes off cleanly.

Doesn't bring any silage or catch in the layers like net.
 

Funkeyfarmer

Well-Known Member
Started using plastic on plastic in 2019 switched fully over last year main reason was easier for feeding no messing with net wrap, very little waste either. only down side I was told with the the nrf warp was it needed to be separated from the normal wrap for recycling, thankfully my lads have a khun which uses normal wrap
 

c4l

Well-Known Member
Started using plastic on plastic in 2019 switched fully over last year main reason was easier for feeding no messing with net wrap, very little waste either. only down side I was told with the the nrf warp was it needed to be separated from the normal wrap for recycling, thankfully my lads have a khun which uses normal wrap
Nrf goes with the fert bags I'm assuming? Gotta wonder how many lads got caught out the first year they had it
 
Top