Fence Posts/Stakes

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Do you value your time at all? Are you drawing work on yourself to save only a small bit

I have a lot of value on my time, but I would find something like this would give me a lot of satisfaction as well as giving me something to do over a couple of dark wet nights. At the end of the day, it would probably save me nothing, but I'd have a much better job than if I bought them.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Do you not think creosoted timber posts would look far nicer next to a laneway?

Personally I don't like them. They look grand for a year or 2 and then they start to fade that ugly gray colour. Then you have to start messing with creosote or burned oil - I really hate that kind of repetitive craic!
 

Bog Man

Well-Known Member
Did anybody ever split oak for stakes . My father always said split oak stakes needed no cresote.
I dug up an oak stake while doing a drainage job last Autumn that had not seen the light of day for at least 25 years and it was perfect.
Some of the fencing on the M9 is being replaced and it is only there 10 years.
 

mixed fleet

Well-Known Member
I was just pricing it up today. I want a galvanised post along a laneway which is 250 meters in length and I want to to put 2 row of electric fence onto it. My only reason for a galvanised post is the aesthetics. A standard clipex post is 3mm steel and it is star shaped. They come in at roughly €7.30 per post for 1.5 meter posts. I would also have to buy the electric fence insulators at €0.70 each. That's €8.70 inc 2 insulators. A strainer post is €21.

I went at it from another angle. I can buy 6mm 1" angle for €16 per length. That's 4 posts or €4 per post. I can cut them down, point them and drill them. I can get them galvanised for approx €1 each. I could get an electric fence insulator with a roll pin in it for €0.50. That's €6 for what would be a much heavier post. I could make a good strong strainer post by welding 2 angle posts together and making a prop for it if necessary and having it all dipped for approx €12. You can get nice decorative plastic caps for the angle iron too at less than 25c each.
I think it merits a closer look!

Have you that right, can you get a 6 metre length of 1" angle galvanised for €4.
I thought galvanizing cost about the same as the steel to buy ??
 
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Mid cork

Well-Known Member
Did anybody ever split oak for stakes . My father always said split oak stakes needed no cresote.
I dug up an oak stake while doing a drainage job last Autumn that had not seen the light of day for at least 25 years and it was perfect.
Some of the fencing on the M9 is being replaced and it is only there 10 years.
I believe the reason the fences on the motorways are being replaced is for safety reasons. Apparently there was lot of horrific accidents when cars crashed into the fences. The horizontal timber rails were impalling people. The new fences have no horizontal rails. You would think they should have known that before they put them up when they built the motorways.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Have you that right, can you get a 6 metre length of 1" angle galvanised for €4.
I thought galvanizing cost about the same as the steel to buy ??
No. 4 euro per post. 16 euro per 6 meter length. Galvanising is charged by weight. We got doors dipped in tynagh before Christmas and it cost 20 euro per door approx

EDIT

Sorry, I was on the road all day yesterday and my eyes deceived me when I got home, so I didn't read that right. It costs roughly €1/kg to get steel galvanised in Tynagh if you deliver it to them. Each 6 meter length of angle which is 30x30x5 weighs 700g/meter or 4.2 kg per length. Each 6m length will make 4 posts, so galvanising would cost roughly €1 per post - well that's what they told me yesterday when I rang
 
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nashmach

Well-Known Member
Did he try Tommy Williamson? Very decent man to deal with and everyone seems to recommend his stakes

Go to Tommy Williamson near you and buy the creosote hexagon stakes and relax for another 25 years. Stay away from his round ones as the creosote just washes off them.

Thanks To both @Profi Farmer And @thefarminglad for the recommendations for Tommy. My father was up there today and quite impressed by what he saw anyway and not bad value either (At a rough calculation).
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
I believe the reason the fences on the motorways are being replaced is for safety reasons. Apparently there was lot of horrific accidents when cars crashed into the fences. The horizontal timber rails were impalling people. The new fences have no horizontal rails. You would think they should have known that before they put them up when they built the motorways.
Dual carriage way here built with I suppose 5 years.
Wire rope down the centre of it fair madness
 

AYF

Well-Known Member
Dual carriage way here built with I suppose 5 years.
Wire rope down the centre of it fair madness
The wire rope that does a figure 8 between the posts you mean?

That stuff is designed in order to catch cars under it. So that they don't make it to the opposite carriageway but don't bounce back either

Saw a car neatly wedged under it on the A55 here. Does work. As long as the car isnt going stupid fast over the limit. But then not much will save you at 100mph!
 

WestCorkBoy

Well-Known Member
The wire rope that does a figure 8 between the posts you mean?

That stuff is designed in order to catch cars under it. So that they don't make it to the opposite carriageway but don't bounce back either

Saw a car neatly wedged under it on the A55 here. Does work. As long as the car isnt going stupid fast over the limit. But then not much will save you at 100mph!
The problem with wire rope is motorcyclists it is worse than hitting a concrete wall as you would glance off a concrete barrier and keep rolling but get caught in the rope. Unusual for it to be used on new roads usually only done nowadays in retrofit situations (cork -mallow road )
 

Arthur

Well-Known Member
The problem with wire rope is motorcyclists it is worse than hitting a concrete wall as you would glance off a concrete barrier and keep rolling but get caught in the rope. Unusual for it to be used on new roads usually only done nowadays in retrofit situations (cork -mallow road )
The wire rope could behead a motorcyclist.
 

Bog Man

Well-Known Member
The wire rope could behead a motorcyclist.
Apparently they slide along the ropes but get a sudden stop with the uprights . There is also some evidence that motorcyclists go slower beside the wire because it looks dangerous .
The new fences beside the motorway do seem to be where cars could go through them . I wonder what they did with the old stakes and rails . Asking for a friend .
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
The wire rope that does a figure 8 between the posts you mean?

That stuff is designed in order to catch cars under it. So that they don't make it to the opposite carriageway but don't bounce back either

Saw a car neatly wedged under it on the A55 here. Does work. As long as the car isnt going stupid fast over the limit. But then not much will save you at 100mph!
No its just sections say every 5th post there might be a tensioner
 
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jpt

Well-Known Member
Apparently they slide along the ropes but get a sudden stop with the uprights . There is also some evidence that motorcyclists go slower beside the wire because it looks dangerous .
The new fences beside the motorway do seem to be where cars could go through them . I wonder what they did with the old stakes and rails . Asking for a friend .
Bikers call them cheesecutters.
 

bk1991

Well-Known Member
Iv bit of fenceing to do this year where i got the over grown hedges cut with track machine and saw . What is best option to fence for a long term job ?
3 rows of barbed wire ? It will only be for cattle . Would love to do the whole job sheep wire and all just in case down few years they appear ......
whats best posts and spaceings ? Was going to get contractor in but its not hard put up new fences if i get someone to drive the stakes .
 

Merv_B

Well-Known Member
Sheep wire on all the boundary fences and a run of plain wire on top. That way they shouldn’t be getting in and if you do get sheep they will at least be kept on your farm rather than having to search the parish for them.
 

massey 6480

Well-Known Member
Iv bit of fenceing to do this year where i got the over grown hedges cut with track machine and saw . What is best option to fence for a long term job ?
3 rows of barbed wire ? It will only be for cattle . Would love to do the whole job sheep wire and all just in case down few years they appear ......
whats best posts and spaceings ? Was going to get contractor in but its not hard put up new fences if i get someone to drive the stakes .
Single strand of electric fencing is all you need or 2 strands if you like . The day of barb fencing is gone . In 5 years time your barb fence will be back covered in bushes and briars and a pain for a hedge cutter to deal with . Electric fence you will always have a hedge that can be easily cut each year and a better long term fence . That can be easily repaired/ maintained.
The sheep wire fence is a super looking fence but unless your keeping in your own sheep or keeping out the neighbours sheep it’s over kill for cattle. And unless your willing to keep the fence out far enough for a hedge cutter to work inside it . It’ll be buried in the hedge in a few years .
 

jay gatsby

Well-Known Member
Single strand of electric fencing is all you need or 2 strands if you like . The day of barb fencing is gone . In 5 years time your barb fence will be back covered in bushes and briars and a pain for a hedge cutter to deal with . Electric fence you will always have a hedge that can be easily cut each year and a better long term fence . That can be easily repaired/ maintained.
The sheep wire fence is a super looking fence but unless your keeping in your own sheep or keeping out the neighbours sheep it’s over kill for cattle. And unless your willing to keep the fence out far enough for a hedge cutter to work inside it . It’ll be buried in the hedge in a few years .
Would have liked that post twice if I could!!
 

scoffcruddle

Well-Known Member
The sheep wire fence is a super looking fence but unless your keeping in your own sheep or keeping out the neighbours sheep it’s over kill for cattle. And unless your willing to keep the fence out far enough for a hedge cutter to work inside it . It’ll be buried in the hedge in a few years .

Doesn’t matter if the sheep netting is buried it will still keep the sheep out or in,I put a gate on my drive as I had more of my neighbours sheep in the yard than he had in the field.

I wouldn’t ever use single strand electric on a boundary fence,it’ll either get cut or end up shorted with your stock scattered around the parish.
 

bk1991

Well-Known Member
Single strand of electric fencing is all you need or 2 strands if you like . The day of barb fencing is gone . In 5 years time your barb fence will be back covered in bushes and briars and a pain for a hedge cutter to deal with . Electric fence you will always have a hedge that can be easily cut each year and a better long term fence . That can be easily repaired/ maintained.
The sheep wire fence is a super looking fence but unless your keeping in your own sheep or keeping out the neighbours sheep it’s over kill for cattle. And unless your willing to keep the fence out far enough for a hedge cutter to work inside it . It’ll be buried in the hedge in a few years .

Doesn’t matter if the sheep netting is buried it will still keep the sheep out or in,I put a gate on my drive as I had more of my neighbours sheep in the yard than he had in the field.

I wouldn’t ever use single strand electric on a boundary fence,it’ll either get cut or end up shorted with your stock scattered around the parish.


Both of theese has got me thinking . Iv one boundry fence to do and maby best put the barbed but the electric has me thinking for the internal fences . How far out would be needed to allow to trim hedge ? ?
 
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