glanbia

whelan1

Well-Known Member
The Gain statement is a bit meh. We are disappointed...... surely the horses couldn't run if they tested positive
 

Bog Man

Well-Known Member
What happens if it is not found in the Glanbia feeds supply chain.

It will be a smoke and mirrors cover up.
 

FIAT 450

Well-Known Member
Heard o Brien has left gain and gone to Connelly's. Be safe to say I can't Glanbia been any much of a player in horse feed for along time. The AGM will be fun...
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
The cynic in me says that if this was in cattle or sheep feed we would here little or nothing about it. Just because it involves horses it will get a lot more attention.

Anybody know how much feed would most of these horses be getting a day to compare it to other animals?
 

Nashty

Well-Known Member
It would vary depending on how the horse behaves with feed, but some of these horses could be eating 10kg of meal per day depending on the level of work.
 

gone

Well-Known Member
There was an incident a few years ago where horses were testing positive for drugs and it turned out it was fresh new season Oats was causing false positive in the drug testing.
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
It would vary depending on how the horse behaves with feed, but some of these horses could be eating 10kg of meal per day depending on the level of work.
There was me thinking that they would be getting a kg or 2, they are on the bull finishing diet so :laugh:
 

bagenal

Well-Known Member
I've been thinking about this since I became aware of it from the posts here and surely there's more to this that meets the eye, the substance is illegal to use in the EU and surely Glanbia wouldn't have it around the place so the question is how did or could it get into the product(s)? Sabotage? How long were the horses in France before the test? Who had access to the feed and/or storage area?

There'll be fun and games if Glanbia's batch samples show no trace of contaminant.

Origin and formulation

Zilmax is produced by Merck in France, a country in which the substance is prohibited. As of October 2017, its commercial formulation was 4.8% zilpaterol hydrochloride, 8% polyoxyl castor oil, 4.3% polyvinyl pyrrolidone and 82.9% ground corn cob.
 

Blackwater boy

Moderator
I've been thinking about this since I became aware of it from the posts here and surely there's more to this that meets the eye, the substance is illegal to use in the EU and surely Glanbia wouldn't have it around the place so the question is how did or could it get into the product(s)? Sabotage? How long were the horses in France before the test? Who had access to the feed and/or storage area?

There'll be fun and games if Glanbia's batch samples show no trace of contaminant.

Origin and formulation

Zilmax is produced by Merck in France, a country in which the substance is prohibited. As of October 2017, its commercial formulation was 4.8% zilpaterol hydrochloride, 8% polyoxyl castor oil, 4.3% polyvinyl pyrrolidone and 82.9% ground corn cob.
They did find traces of this stuff in their individual feed samples last Friday according to a post on their Twitter account an hour ago. I’d imagine they have identified the source by now but will not say in public yet what it was or how it happened but I really doubt it was in the mill and added on purpose to the feed.
 

humungus

Well-Known Member
They did find traces of this stuff in their individual feed samples last Friday according to a post on their Twitter account an hour ago. I’d imagine they have identified the source by now but will not say in public yet what it was or how it happened but I really doubt it was in the mill and added on purpose to the feed.
i,d say it will come down to a boat not being cleaned properly after carrying a contaminated load beforehand or some such mistake being made somewhere along the line, remember a few years ago there was traces of meat and bone meal found in cattle rations and it ended up coming from german beet pulp which was grown on land that has meat and bonemeal spread on it before the crop was planted and traces were stuck to the beet
 

Nashty

Well-Known Member
There was me thinking that they would be getting a kg or 2, they are on the bull finishing diet so :laugh:
I am not a horse man but my family are steeped in them. I would have seen a lot of them as a result, feeding levels are really down to the individual horse and his / her behaviour. Some of the warm blood horses can be borderline impossible to manage behaviour wise at high levels of feeding. Some others require very high levels of feeding to perform at their optimum. It really is a horses for courses scenario to pardon the pun.
 

Bcl

Well-Known Member
What do lads make of whats being inferred by that Paul kimmage article in sunday independent today about the o briens and the contaminated feed?
Maybe I'm coming to the wrong conclusion about it.
It's strange that Paul kimmage is taking an interest in this matter, he usually only writes about one element of sport ....
 

Blackwater boy

Moderator
What do lads make of whats being inferred by that Paul kimmage article in sunday independent today about the o briens and the contaminated feed?
Maybe I'm coming to the wrong conclusion about it.
It's strange that Paul kimmage is taking an interest in this matter, he usually only writes about one element of sport ....
Any link to that or what was he saying? I have no read it
 

Bcl

Well-Known Member
Any link to that or what was he saying? I have no read it
I just read it in the paper above in the home place, I'd say it can be got on independent.ie, I'm not sure how to get link on here.
Basically kimmage asked o brien that it "seemed kind of absurd that they are the only trainers whose horses have tested positive for this product " or something along those lines.
Seems a lot of other trainers , ger Lyons, Jim bolger, Ken condon fed same stuff but tested negative
 

Dunmasc

Well-Known Member
What do lads make of whats being inferred by that Paul kimmage article in sunday independent today about the o briens and the contaminated feed?
Maybe I'm coming to the wrong conclusion about it.
It's strange that Paul kimmage is taking an interest in this matter, he usually only writes about one element of sport ....
I would pay no heed to Paul Kimmage. He often looks for a story where there is none. A few years ago when Jamie Heaslip got injured before playing England, Kimmage said the injury was fake to cover up for dropping him for the game. That injury ended Heaslip career and I've not seen an apology for the article. P K thinks everyone is doping and I find him very bitter about sport or anything he commented on in general. From what I have read about it, it passes very quickly through the horse and if tested a few days later it would be gone.
 

Bot.exe

Well-Known Member
I would pay no heed to Paul Kimmage. He often looks for a story where there is none. A few years ago when Jamie Heaslip got injured before playing England, Kimmage said the injury was fake to cover up for dropping him for the game. That injury ended Heaslip career and I've not seen an apology for the article. P K thinks everyone is doping and I find him very bitter about sport or anything he commented on in general. From what I have read about it, it passes very quickly through the horse and if tested a few days later it would be gone.
Kimmage was insinuating that Heaslip had failed a drug test and it was being covered up.
He is obsessive to a fault but does push buttons other journalists refuse to go near
 
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Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
I would pay no heed to Paul Kimmage. He often looks for a story where there is none. A few years ago when Jamie Heaslip got injured before playing England, Kimmage said the injury was fake to cover up for dropping him for the game. That injury ended Heaslip career and I've not seen an apology for the article. P K thinks everyone is doping and I find him very bitter about sport or anything he commented on in general. From what I have read about it, it passes very quickly through the horse and if tested a few days later it would be gone.
Sounds like a perfect drug to be using if it disappears that fast. Wonder what increase in efficiency it was giving, in cattle?
 
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