John Deere

Lebron

Well-Known Member
What would be a suitable tyre combination for a 6630. Currently on 600 65 38 and 16.9 24. Need to change the back at the mo and there is about 40 left on the front. Would like to stay with 600 on the rear but the the 16.9 looks a bit off on the front.
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
Very reliable, 6400 would be even better.

Only issue is getting to this hour of their lives it could make you or break you in terms of repair cost and a lot of independent mechanics wont look at them.

You will spend a few thousand on dry clutches over 10k hours on most tractors, but its more intermittent. Clutch packs/brakes etc all tend to go around 9 or 10k hours in the JD for the first time on them, and its thousands to do anything with.

Two 6400's locally, I know the owners well, gave great service, but it was 3-4k to do the packs when they went in the two of them. One is now at 15k hours and diet feeding everyday. If you can get one with a lot of those repairs done, you'd have a good tractor for years.

Interesting comment on independent mechanics, It's a similar story down here, plenty of independent lads at work but not many into the JD's, I'm not sure why either as while not market leader around here, there are still plenty of them around.
 

c4l

Well-Known Member
Interesting comment on independent mechanics, It's a similar story down here, plenty of independent lads at work but not many into the JD's, I'm not sure why either as while not market leader around here, there are still plenty of them around.
a few independants round here as well but busy as hell to get. took a neighbour about a month and a half to get jd mechanic to get a few gaskets and a few other bits changed on his tractor. the nh man is hard to get too but then again he'd do any machine but give him a hesston baler or combine and he'd have a field day. waiting on him for a couple of months to get a bearing changed on the combine but we're in no rush
 

Kieran97

Well-Known Member
Interesting comment on independent mechanics, It's a similar story down here, plenty of independent lads at work but not many into the JD's, I'm not sure why either as while not market leader around here, there are still plenty of them around.
Cost as far as I can see is a big factor.

Many independents are jack of all trades, but would stick to the simple stuff (Ford, mf, landini, same maybe)

John deere would be more nuanced.
 

Mid cork

Well-Known Member
a few independants round here as well but busy as hell to get. took a neighbour about a month and a half to get jd mechanic to get a few gaskets and a few other bits changed on his tractor. the nh man is hard to get too but then again he'd do any machine but give him a hesston baler or combine and he'd have a field day. waiting on him for a couple of months to get a bearing changed on the combine but we're in no rush
I thought the only tractor he would touch was NH, I presume that’s C.W. your referring to.
 
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c4l

Well-Known Member
I thought the only tractor he would touch was NH, I presume that’s C.W. your referring to.
cw specialises in nh but he'd do other brands within reason from what my old man has said about him. the busiest man alive, he's going all year round. JD mechanic is some1 else then (should've worded it better)
 
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c4l

Well-Known Member
Would ye not do a combine bearing yourselves? A bearing is easy enough.
Changing a bearing is easy enough unless it's located over the drum. Have to tear through a bit to get to it from what I see. And it be handy for an expert's hand as we cut what little of our barley while it was vibrating. Don't know what other damage we done for those few acres
 

no name

Well-Known Member
I'd always get a mechanic to do a few jobs on my combine before the harvest even though I'd be well capable of doing 90% of it myself but by doing so if something serious goes wallop during the harvest he feels more obliged to help me out than if you only call him for the shitty jobs in a panic.
 

13spanner

Well-Known Member
Changing a bearing is easy enough unless it's located over the drum. Have to tear through a bit to get to it from what I see. And it be handy for an expert's hand as we cut what little of our barley while it was vibrating. Don't know what other damage we done for those few acres
True alright.
If it’s a shaker bearing they are fookers.
And the shaft usually goes too.
 
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feirmeoir

Well-Known Member
When you really wanted a New Holland (better not be racist, it could be a Landini) and dad buys you a John Deere


View attachment 88024

you would wonder why the loader is piped into the back, something to do with 60l hydraulics rather than the higher output?
 

Arthur

Well-Known Member
What would be a suitable tyre combination for a 6630. Currently on 600 65 38 and 16.9 24. Need to change the back at the mo and there is about 40 left on the front. Would like to stay with 600 on the rear but the the 16.9 looks a bit off on the front.
Probably 480/65/24 on the front
 

Merv_B

Well-Known Member
What would be a suitable tyre combination for a 6630. Currently on 600 65 38 and 16.9 24. Need to change the back at the mo and there is about 40 left on the front. Would like to stay with 600 on the rear but the the 16.9 looks a bit off on the front.
The 6600 at home is on 540/65 R24 fronts and 650/65 R83s
 

Merv_B

Well-Known Member
Any chance it's 10912hrs? Otherwise why is there a 0 before the 912hrs?
Would say it is genuine low hours and ex Balfour Beatty. Might have had a winch on it.
There were a bunch of similar blue McCormicks in an auction a few years ago and I think a few of them turned up over here
 
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