Neighbour falling out

jay gatsby

Well-Known Member
Funnily enough a lot of civil servants don't like hassle and if you seem more trouble, for them, than the person complaining, they will very often take the easier road.
That's true enough but particularly in the past 12 months I have seen people willing to spend inordinate amounts of time complaining and reporting people.. I think its a product of covid time off etc.
 

Nashty

Well-Known Member
He has no right to mess up a public road, a lot of these guys would never dream of investing in a underpass or even a road sweeper!, theres a big difference between what the OP is doing on his own property and some thick prick that thinks he can do what he likes on public property and feck everyone else and its that attitude which results in support for the likes of An Taisce, not too many other businesses would get away with continually damaging roads like some of these guys do.
Actually he can, he is entitled to use the road, the council cannot stop him from walking his cows on the road as far as I am aware! It is very much at his own risk from an insurance perspective in the event that they cause a crash etc but I don't think they can stop him walking livestock on a minor road.
 

Ugo Schtiglitz

Well-Known Member
Would blocking their number be an idea?
I dunno. Eventually all war ends in dialogue. I have a bit that's become a bit of a suburb through no fault of my own. I got all the numbers of folks on the bounds and I text around before I spread smelly stuff. Might want to leave the windows shut tomorrow, take washing off line etc. It helps. But if someone is being a bollix just for the sake of it, you'd have to wonder what the real agenda is. I will say there are more and more farmer haters out there.
 

indecisive sort

Well-Known Member
He has no right to mess up a public road, a lot of these guys would never dream of investing in a underpass or even a road sweeper!, theres a big difference between what the OP is doing on his own property and some thick prick that thinks he can do what he likes on public property and feck everyone else and its that attitude which results in support for the likes of An Taisce, not too many other businesses would get away with continually damaging roads like some of these guys do.

fully agree , slurry spreading is the big one ,roads left in an awful mess , contractors need to have road sweepers but farmers need to be willing to pay for them
 

Treemover

Well-Known Member
before you go legal, I would try talking to them. Just tease out what the issue is. If its the quad, maybe you might have to forego that just to keep the peace? If its all of it, ie dust, noise, maybe they dont like the look of the track?

I have seen cases where people get so annoyed common sense goes out the window. So they will spend €6k on legal advice and letters, only to get nowhere.

If your thicked skinned, let them take it to you. Until your asked to attend court, its all just words.

if you own the land, the cow track is on your land; I cant see them having much of a legal case. But there are cow tracks, and theres cow tracks beneath a foot of muck.
 

ABlur

Well-Known Member
Bord Bia and the Department will pay no heed to this guy's complaints. Its a civil matter. Unless there was major pollution or animal welfare issues they are not interested. Call his bluff I'd say.
 

Funkeyfarmer

Well-Known Member
Put in a cow roadway last year to cross a quiet road to rented ground. The road runs along the boundary of the house (a site sold years ago.)

Asked the person at the time, they'd no issues with it. This year they're complaining about noise from the quad going past in the morning, dirt on the road in wet (minor staining imo) dust when its dry and car goes by etc.

Things have escalated recently and they're threatening legal advice they've friends in the dept. Bird bia etc.

Do they have a case? Or just being nasty? Up to this point I would go out of my way to be accommodating to their concerns but its just getting worse.
Any advice appreciated. Received a very passive aggressive text this morning again listing their issues and demanding the roadway be moved. Should I just ignore it altogether? Or politely respond?

Also been keeping record of the road to ensure its clean enough
Only 2 cents I can add is maybe a brush scraper behind the quad to keep where the cows cross the road clean plus if any one comes then to query any complaints about dirtying the road crossing at least you can show you've been keeping it clean or under control at least plus may mid on road signs just things to cover your arse so to speak
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
council landed out to a local farmer on complaints the public road was like a cow track with him marching couple of hundred cows up 4 times a day .He fuked them all roads and told them he was going to buy another 100 cows!!!
What an idiot, talk about painting a target on your back. Regulation will melt your head if someone chooses to come ontop of you, even if you are right
 

Rusty Spade

Well-Known Member
Rev the quad up every time you pass by
I don't think adding to the problem is going to help long term. As Ugo said above, eventually both sides will have to discuss the issue to sort it and both sides will probable have to compromise to reach an agreement.
I'd certainly have a chat with my solicitor to get an idea what the legal obligations are and then call over, with a calm friend/family member, to discuss the issue with them and see what they see the problem being.
It certainly isn't an easy thing to do but it might save large legal fees down the line plus you have some moral high ground in that you approached them to discuss the issue, on their territory, publicly.
It may be as simple as you texting them that you're going to be using that section of road for the next week and they will have to close their windows for those days and you text them that you're finished using it.
 

Neat

Well-Known Member
Make sure you make a note or record of the threat to call their friends in the department and bord bia. That will come back to bit them if you do get any call from either. Stay cool salute away but don’t give them an inch. If the roadway is on your land there is nothing they can do.
 

Rusty Spade

Well-Known Member
I was joking. Is this what farming has become, people telling us how to run our business? Surely when the op cleared it with him before he started the work he has nothing to complain about.
I'm afraid it is.

Aren't we constantly being told we have to seek a social license from Joe and Mary Public to continue farming but they don't have to seek a social license from us to fly all over the world 4 or 5 times a year for the craic?

I'd prefer to try to talk it out with a neighbour if possible before it goes down the legal route. I've seen from the outside what happens when disputes about roadways and access to them does to two farm families. Both are right and wrong and neither want to compromise. So it's just going to stay going for another generation to get caught up in and fester even more. It's not a nice predicament to be stuck in, tbh.
 

ts115

Well-Known Member
I was joking. Is this what farming has become, people telling us how to run our business? Surely when the op cleared it with him before he started the work he has nothing to complain about.
What happens on your farm is your business (and the departments 🙁 ), what you do on a public road is another matter and if you're depending on public resources for you business to operate it might be wise to avoid bringing attention on yourselve, although from the state of some of the roads I've seen after cows on them twice a day for years it doesn't look like much is done about it. Ireland is a funny place, the law is one thing who you know is another.
 

AYF

Well-Known Member
Have a chat with them.

Keep a brush in the hedge and give the worst of the shite a bit of a sweep after crossing.

Tell them youll try and get a better exhaust for the quat, but it may take some time to sort as the parts come from afar, they'll get used to it.


Write a note of all the little chats you have, timed and dated. Just in case.
 

Arthur

Well-Known Member
Really? Its easily possible to spread slurry without leaving roads an awful mess. Unless I'm doing it wrong somehow?
A lot depends on the gateway and field conditions, some lads around here would have a round feeder inside the gate for a month leading into winter and expect you to drive through the resultant mess to get into the field which would be hocked for fifty yards out.
 

bagenal

Well-Known Member
I'm not going to comment too much as this is in the public and any Joe/Josephine Soap could read it and get ideas but re the comments that the neighbour wouldn't have a leg to stand on if they went the legal route, well I certainly wouldn't be betting a weeks wages on that :wink:

Plenty have said above and I agree is go chat and come to some sort of mutual agreement, involving legal eagles on either or both sides is going to come to no good in the end and the only winners will be the legal people sucking money like ticks suck blood.
 

indecisive sort

Well-Known Member
A lot depends on the gateway and field conditions, some lads around here would have a round feeder inside the gate for a month leading into winter and expect you to drive through the resultant mess to get into the field which would be hocked for fifty yards out.

or a pilot who boots it when leaving the field and sends sh1t flying everywhere for the first few hundred metres
 

Bog Man

Well-Known Member
or a pilot who boots it when leaving the field and sends sh1t flying everywhere for the first few hundred metres
When we were renting a lot of land it was policy to go both directions out of a gateway so it muddied the waters as to which gateway the muck came out of . If you drove slowly for the first 100 meters with dual wheels and then speeded up the neighboring farmers would get some of the blame .
 
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