No Till biological farming

Discussion in 'Tillage' started by Louis mc, Dec 6, 2015.

  1. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    I wasnt advocating the above pictures as responsible outwintering
     
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  2. Mid cork

    Mid cork Well-Known Member

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    I couldn’t agree with you more.If conditions are rite out wintering can work very well. We out winter suckler cows every year on spring barley stubble,grazing fodder beet and a small bite of silage. The cows are never up to their bellies in muck and always have dry place to lie.You have to be on dry ground with shelter and most importantly not over stocked. I have had groops from Kildalton to see it and am happy to show it to anyone.
     
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  3. Louis mc

    Louis mc Well-Known Member

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    You could argue ploughing is very irresponsible and terrible abuse of soil (and I usually do)
     
  4. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    I agree also from an economic and animal health point of view out wintering is a perfectly fine practice. Especially with the horribly mild winters we’ve recently had.

    The above pics were posted to show the disrespect some people have for land. There was no need to poach the grass field so much and the beet should have been harvested earlier to protect the land (well that’s what I’d do anyway).
    Ploughing in good conditions is a million miles away from this in terms of soil care (as recently stated in the UK agronomists conference I believe?).
     
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  5. marco

    marco Well-Known Member

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    When you're turning over the plough?:fight:
     
  6. JohnBoy

    JohnBoy Well-Known Member

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    Any chance of some pictures?
     
  7. Hardysplicer

    Hardysplicer Well-Known Member

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    Off on his high horse
    Again
     
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  8. guest 1

    guest 1 Guest

    I hope the moral high ground keeps yielding well, it's a long way down to the bottom of a furrow.
     
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  9. Mid cork

    Mid cork Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I will do a few tomorrow.
     
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  10. Louis mc

    Louis mc Well-Known Member

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    The view is mighty up here. I've no idea what the second half of your sentence means
     
  11. Mid cork

    Mid cork Well-Known Member

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    E36EF30A-F367-4B3A-8E41-9EFDF0F67078.jpeg 29E26534-F58E-4EA9-9819-77EA894C1562.jpeg 541C0C8B-5C2E-4FA1-A2A0-57DAAA34159D.jpeg 2502CD93-CB01-4947-84BE-CE429CF0EFD7.jpeg 93070AB0-CE6E-4EB7-8DD2-387B6F0FDE26.jpeg 1EFEC1F1-1681-4166-B051-A7C75F2C40C6.jpeg
    Not the best morning to take pics,a hell of a lot of rain overnight.Only silage on the menu this morning,fodder beet tomorrow. I just moved the round feeders I usually move them once a week or so depending on the weather.
     
  12. marco

    marco Well-Known Member

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    thats very dry ground
     
  13. Bog Man

    Bog Man Well-Known Member

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    DOES GLOMALIN HOLD YOUR FARM TOGETHER?
    Glomalin was only discovered in 1996 basically because it is a bit inert . It is one of the complex pieces of the jigsaw that hold your soil together .

    Glomalin is extremely “tough”. It is resistant to microbial decay (lasting at least 10 to 50 years) and does not dissolve easily in water. Glomalin is soluble at high temperatures (121 o C or 250 o F). These properties make glomalin a good protector of hyphae and soil aggregates. The unusual extraction conditions remove high quantities of the rich organic material (i.e. glomalin) leaving soil a mineral grey color (Fig. 2). Glomalin accounts for a large amount (about 15 to 20%) of the organic carbon in undisturbed soils.

    Glomalin and Soil Aggregation Soil aggregation is a complex process that glues together of soil particles (minerals, organic matter, etc.) together into pellets. These pellets are rich in nutrients and resist erosion. Hyphae act as a frame upon which soil particles may collect while glomalin glues them together and protects them (Figs. 1 and 3). This is similar to walls in a house, where boards (i.e. hyphae) are used to frame-up the wall, insulation (i.e. soil particles) fills in spaces between boards, wall board (i.e. microbial glues, like glomalin and fungal and bacterial polysaccharides) help keep everything in place, and finally it is all coated with a protective layer of paint (i.e. glomalin).

    Sticking soil particles together (i.e. aggregate formation) is just one part of the process and one role for glomalin and other microbial polysaccharides. Glomalin is an important molecule in aggregate stabilization. When aggregates are not stabilized, they break apart with rainfall. Organic matter and nutrients within disrupted aggregates may be lost to rain and wind erosion. The chemistry of glomalin makes it an ideal stabilizing coat.




    https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1144429.pdf

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glomalin
     
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  14. Bog Man

    Bog Man Well-Known Member

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    Alan Newport | Jun 15, 2017

    discovered in 1996 by ARS soil scientist Sara Wright. It is a carbohydrate-based "soil glue" that contains 30-40% carbon. Glomalin is the substance that creates clumps of soil granules called aggregates. These are what add structure to healthy soil. They also keep other stored soil carbon from escaping.


    Technically, glomalin is considered a glycoprotein, which stores carbon in both its protein and carbohydrate (glucose or sugar) subunits. Because it stores so much carbon, glomalin is increasingly being included in studies of carbon storage and soil quality.

    Recently, researchers have discovered some soil microbes also produce compounds similar to glomalin. That information is hard to track down, but the news implies complexity of life continues to have high value.

    Further, scientists have found glomalin weighs from 2 to 24 times more than humic acid, which is the byproduct of decaying plants that once was thought to be the main contributor to soil carbon storage. Now scientists say humic acid contributes only about 8% of soil carbon.

    Glomalin is an amazing material scientists say is actually difficult to break down. AMF produce glomalin to coat hyphae to keep water and nutrients from getting lost on the way to and from the plant.

    Glomalin is extremely “tough”. It is resistant to microbial decay (lasting at least 10 to 50 years) and does not dissolve easily in water. Glomalin is soluble at high temperatures (250 degrees F). These properties make it a good protector of hyphae and soil aggregates.

    https://www.beefproducer.com/soil-health/you-need-more-glomalin-soil-mechanic


    Glomalin concentration and aggregate stability were examined through three years during conversion from conventional tillage (P-T) to no-till (N-T) corn. Researchers also compared this with a perennial grass that grew undisturbed for 15 years as a buffer around the plots.

    They say increases in soil stability and glomalin formations yearly. Yet in three years neither had approached what they found in the undisturbed grass.

    This shows two things:

    1. Glomalin and soil stability increase slowly over time with improved soil management.

    2. The agent of glomalin formation -- arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi -- forms slowly over time with improved soil management.

    Note in the chart there was no increase in glomalin or soil aggregate formation in the plowed field plots.

    Higher levels of glomalin give greater water infiltration, more permeability to air, better root development, higher microbial activity, resistance to surface sealing (crusts) and to erosion (wind/water).
     
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  15. Bog Man

    Bog Man Well-Known Member

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  16. OakFarming

    OakFarming Well-Known Member

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    Found this video interesting.

     
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  17. Bog Man

    Bog Man Well-Known Member

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    Driving in a ring three inches for a water infiltration test.
    0220DA7A-BC89-48EB-A216-FFA27DF69C60.jpeg
    440 ml is the equivalent of an inch of rain.
    20440892-2396-409B-A807-6A56A0AD5698.jpeg
    It infiltrated in one minute forty four seconds.
    ED9DD958-713E-482E-866A-31DCB5D28FFB.jpeg
    There did not seem to be that many worms .
    7E5C434F-5C9E-4903-B7A1-1A6D4F80EF7F.jpeg
    This measured how hard it was to push a rod into the ground. . Above 200 and roots cannot penetrate . It was at about 15 inches here .
    772F8ABB-B4FB-4E33-8CA3-4ABC8011A860.jpeg
     
  18. marco

    marco Well-Known Member

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  19. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    I assume this was in Kilkenny?

    How long should it take the water to infiltrate? I assume this will vary according to soil type & moisture content regardless of other factors?
     
  20. Bog Man

    Bog Man Well-Known Member

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    This field has not been plowed in 17 years but has lovely soil. He did a Brix test on the sap from the leaves. This is what all the Farmers are doing. It measures the sugar in the sap . The more sugar the more growth.
    Put a chemical on one plot and do a brix test and have a control and compare the difference.
    If you can measure it you can manage it .
    D8B17997-67FA-4C18-92A3-060C75CDD248.jpeg AF774E3E-130F-424D-B4EE-F46BBBE1460E.jpeg
     
  21. Bog Man

    Bog Man Well-Known Member

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    It did not infiltrate at all in a permanent tram line which would be a worst case and the ground was dry under the tram line that had been driven over four times since harvest but not rutted . He recommended putting filter traps in the field to measure soil runoff .
     
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  22. towbar

    towbar Well-Known Member

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    Was this an event or n your farm @Bog Man ?
     
  23. Bog Man

    Bog Man Well-Known Member

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    It was in Kilkenny and meeting organized by Groups Together which is a group made up of Discussion and Buyers groups from around the country.
     
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  24. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    Interesting stuff there Bog Man, Thanks for sharing.

    AB is getting great value out of that umbrella, must be over 25 years old :laugh:
     
  25. Paw

    Paw Well-Known Member

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