Paus Loaders

lough

Well-Known Member
I see Farmer Phil has a Paus Loader, I never seen one before, are they as useful as they look

 

FIAT 450

Well-Known Member
Was just chatting with the brother in law about it. looks high maintenance and Christ if you have aload on the bucket and it out the side id be bricking it in case she tipped to the side.
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
Was just chatting with the brother in law about it. looks high maintenance and Christ if you have aload on the bucket and it out the side id be bricking it in case she tipped to the side.

First point was exactly what I was thinking, grand now but in 20 years time??
 

headcase

Very Senior Member
If its a slew ring and rotary coupling like on a excavator then it'll probably be not too bad, its the fact its almost certainly going to fall over at sometime in its life, there's no doubt some safety features but even so!!
I'm with you
Bound to fall over
 

AYF

Well-Known Member
Was just chatting with the brother in law about it. looks high maintenance and Christ if you have aload on the bucket and it out the side id be bricking it in case she tipped to the side.
Ittl land on the loader if it does.
And if the front half can rotate separately to the cab.....

Not saying going over is good.
But would be preferable to going over in a normal handler I think?!?
 

ponderosa

Well-Known Member
If its a slew ring and rotary coupling like on a excavator then it'll probably be not too bad, its the fact its almost certainly going to fall over at sometime in its life, there's no doubt some safety features but even so!!
I think its 2 extra rams is all. I would love to have 1 could see many benefits. Even loading trailers in a field wouldn't take half the trafficking. Reach over a feed barrier in a tight passage. Filling bales in a tight spot. Hope i get a demo for this
 

drew

Well-Known Member
In the right hands at the right job I’m sure slewing it round will be fine, but I’ll never forget the first time I loaded lime a 416, on the big 28.1/26’s, you sit into it thinking this is a big lump and plenty stable, then you come at the spreader fully locked round and go to let out the bucket and feel the whole lot tip towards the spreader.. I can only imagine how bad it could be with the boom skewed off to the side out over the front wheel with something heavy
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
You could see how handy it would be, had a rotating Merlo here in the summer, the owner could get in anywhere with it and work away, a serious bit of kit.
 

AYF

Well-Known Member
You could see how handy it would be, had a rotating Merlo here in the summer, the owner could get in anywhere with it and work away, a serious bit of kit.
What were they doing with the Merlo?
I was keen to buy one of them for a different kind of contracting idea.
No one else could see the advantages though so the idea fizzled out!
 

jf 850

Well-Known Member
When you see the ration they have and the good silage , maize and wholecrop. Is it nearly a pity they havent better stock to feed.

I said that to the rest of them here . Ditch the conacre , and have half the stock , but upgrade to even AA and Hex .
It cost money to feed the Jersey Boys that didn't make it . He sometimes mentions seriously heavy bulls . Definitely . If they were half as heavy again .

I like his honesty, the ordinary well used machinery , his father's have a go at anything attitude .
But they make a lot of work for themselves , feeding big numbers of rubbish cattle , plus they seem to have a fair bit of work with the umbilical system .
 

Emg12

Well-Known Member
I said that to the rest of them here . Ditch the conacre , and have half the stock , but upgrade to even AA and Hex .
It cost money to feed the Jersey Boys that didn't make it . He sometimes mentions seriously heavy bulls . Definitely . If they were half as heavy again .

I like his honesty, the ordinary well used machinery , his father's have a go at anything attitude .
But they make a lot of work for themselves , feeding big numbers of rubbish cattle , plus they seem to have a fair bit of work with the umbilical system .
He didnt mention before about better quality stock i reckon, but it was the initial cost to buy the calves was the issue and they didnt gain enough addittional weight to justify the purchase cost. He reckoned because of that was more profit in fresians and the like. Cant say i know if hes right or not. They definitely could make things easier for themselves.
 

leoh

Well-Known Member
Would most of his cattle average say around euro1000 dead ....by the time he buys calves rears, grazes for 2 summers and 2 winter and finish he won't have much out of them .....then as u say all this rented ground and rented sheds machinery big fancy barley bruiser and Phillip seems to think they have the home grown ration for next to nothing I think he's a bit gullible
 

drew

Well-Known Member
I said that to the rest of them here . Ditch the conacre , and have half the stock , but upgrade to even AA and Hex .
It cost money to feed the Jersey Boys that didn't make it . He sometimes mentions seriously heavy bulls . Definitely . If they were half as heavy again .

I like his honesty, the ordinary well used machinery , his father's have a go at anything attitude .
But they make a lot of work for themselves , feeding big numbers of rubbish cattle , plus they seem to have a fair bit of work with the umbilical system .
We only do a small handful of them compared to what they are at but tbh when all is accounted for the fr probably leaves as much behind as the aa. Especially the last few years the aa seem to be gone worse and worse(quality wise), too many have pushed to hard to easy calving and it’s pulled a lot of the good from them(I’m not saying all but unfortunately it’s what I see of them, they are being pushed as the easy calving cleanup bull). We get all ours from one herd and their Angus were coming from what on paper was a good quality stock bull but it’s gone to the point that they’ve given up on the aa bull as they could see it themselves that they weren’t getting offered anything extra for the aa calves, the market demand has been flooded and the dealers/ marts were only barely getting the Aa above a fr bull calf.

Now maybe it’s largely that for the last few years anything in the country that was half worth while was getting a fr straw to help with the expanding herds and as a result the continental/traditional beef breeds were only being used on the absolute dregs of the dairy herd, and now things are starting to level off a little the amount going to the fr ai may drop off a little again, I don’t know my crystal ball never worked 😂
 

17442

Well-Known Member
I said that to the rest of them here . Ditch the conacre , and have half the stock , but upgrade to even AA and Hex .
It cost money to feed the Jersey Boys that didn't make it . He sometimes mentions seriously heavy bulls . Definitely . If they were half as heavy again .

I like his honesty, the ordinary well used machinery , his father's have a go at anything attitude .
But they make a lot of work for themselves , feeding big numbers of rubbish cattle , plus they seem to have a fair bit of work with the umbilical system .

Yes they always seem to be chasing their tails there so to speak.

Can’t get over that 6290 sat in the garage for 5 years
 

Bog Man

Well-Known Member
Yes they always seem to be chasing their tails there so to speak.

Can’t get over that 6290 sat in the garage for 5 years
I think it was sat in a field for a year and a half and was brought in and canabalised for parts . Every shed seems to be full of rubbish . Just because you can fix something does not mean you should be fixing it . It should have had the pump replaced and shifted on if he did not need it for five years . The €15000 would have gone a long way on a decent loader that they badly need .
The type of contracting they are doing seems to be running out of steam . A local pipe man is reputably giving up .
 
Top