Rolling!

How fast do you roll yours!

  • Up to 5kph (3mph)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 5-7kph

    Votes: 5 13.2%
  • 7-9kph

    Votes: 21 55.3%
  • 10-12kph

    Votes: 8 21.1%
  • 13-15kph

    Votes: 1 2.6%
  • 15kph+

    Votes: 1 2.6%
  • 20k

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Flaaaarrr out till your bouncing out the seat?

    Votes: 2 5.3%

  • Total voters
    38

AYF

Well-Known Member
Following a bit of a debate with a mate of mine on the simple matter of rolling silage fields (we lead sad lives!) Both of us had very different views on the job!

I just want an idea who might have been correct, if there is such a thing!
 

scoffcruddle

Well-Known Member
We do very little rolling here,set a lass off when she had a spare hour or two and set the tractor at 8.5kph for the smooth bits and 6kph for anywhere rough,it was spot on.
Lad who’s worked part time for me for the last 7 years did some and he might as well not have bothered,he’s a steady lad but seemed to think it was a race,ffs you look and see if your doing the job.
 
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scoffcruddle

Well-Known Member
Hear of a farmer sent a lad to do 10 rounds of the field basically the roughest bits around the hedges, the lad drove the outside round 10 times.

A bit like a lad who worked for my dad,is that a 2nd gear job or a 3rd gear job was his favourite question,he finished rolling a field and decided to move to the next,picked the wrong gateway,10’ roller and 8’ gateway 😂

My dad once set him off painting and he came to the house to ask “is it up down twice and one across?”😂
 

bk1991

Well-Known Member
Only started to roll the silage fields the past few years fully before that it was only two or three rounds. I think 7-8km is fast enough otherwise might aswell not have bothered. As my father used to say ‘’you never seen a steam roller going fast’’ if roller is bouncing its waste of time.
 

Arthur

Well-Known Member
I would hazard a guess that 10% of the ground we cut for silage is rolled then the farmer wonders why the ground isn't shaved by the mower, the mower runs on the high spots and a lodged crop will duck the mower but when you take of the overlying grass will then want to stand up, what I'm suggesting is that the man that doesn't roll the field gets no advantage of yield because what he has grown gets left behind because the mower can't cut it as tight without scalping clay and probably reducing yield of aftermath.
 
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