Slurry

Your only supposed to spread in the open period if there is no heavy rain forecast.
Lads seem to be under the impression that they can do whatever they want once January comes.
Of we get a dry day in December then everyone says sure these rules are a joke we could be spreading away today.
Nothing to do with the fact that there overstocked for the amount of storage
While it’s a case that common sense should prevail, it’s hard when the very people making the rules lack that same common sense. It might be dry in the winter than it was in the summer like it was the previous year but yet you can’t spread even if conditions and forecast is right, you have no choice then when the window opens and are more under pressure to have to take the chance.

And I doubt there many places in the country that really have that much storage over what’s recommended. That not to say you shouldn’t, but all regulations has to work in correlation with each other not independently like they seem to
 
About a quarter of all nutrient loss from the Teagasc catchment area happens in the closed periods. That was with nobody spreading too.

Its not ok to spread just because the ground is dry. With the short days and low sun the grass can't grow so any nutrients can't get taken up by the plant.

Slurry just sits there in/on the soil until it rains and gets washed out into the rivers.
 
Hey lads tanks not full yet thank god.but du the aggigation points that are outside. would alot of water b going in there d ye think thanks lads
Does the yard fall that way towards the tank? Rain landing it will make negligible difference. However water runoff from the yard could be an issue if not diverted.
 
If I was to agitate a tank tomorrow and take out 2 loads to take the pressure off and then come back in 2 weeks and add a tank or two of water and agitate again. Would it be safe to leave the cattle in the shed for the second agitation after 2 weeks or am I safer taking them out?
 
If I was to agitate a tank tomorrow and take out 2 loads to take the pressure off and then come back in 2 weeks and add a tank or two of water and agitate again. Would it be safe to leave the cattle in the shed for the second agitation after 2 weeks or am I safer taking them out?
Is it a big job to take them out - why the reluctance? For us we have central mixing points so we always need to move them.
Not sure anyone would be recommending to leave them on whilst mixing as the crust would already be starting to form.
There needs a really strong wind through the shed on the day to even think about it.
 
If I was to agitate a tank tomorrow and take out 2 loads to take the pressure off and then come back in 2 weeks and add a tank or two of water and agitate again. Would it be safe to leave the cattle in the shed for the second agitation after 2 weeks or am I safer taking them out?

No take them off the second time.
 
Thanks for the replies lads. I’ll take them out. I’ve only one yard to let them into and they are 3 different pens of cattle/ages so it’s a pain sorting them out again
 
To be honest never take cattle out here . Too many cattle and mixing them only upsets them . How closed in is your shed or what style of slatted shed is it .
As massey said above, I also never take cattle out, probably mixing slurry for over 25 years.
 
Were the same here tbh, no where to let them all out but we always wait for a windy day and have everything as open as possible, we’ve shutters on the back of the shed for meal trough so they are opened up.
 
Lads not taking them out is taking an awful chance. Spread slurry for 60 farmers here a year, about 50% take them out and 50% don’t, most of the time they are sound but I have seen times when they weren’t sound and them times it was never just one animal that would go down. Better have them out than waiting for that one time.
 
Don't take them out either, mix after giving fresh silage for a short period to break the crust while their heads are out feeding. My sheds are all single rows of slats and fairly open.
 
Don't take them out either, mix after giving fresh silage for a short period to break the crust while their heads are out feeding. My sheds are all single rows of slats and fairly open.
Same here windy day just after feed put out to start mixing the cow shed. Nowhere really to let the cows out to.
 
Lads not taking them out is taking an awful chance. Spread slurry for 60 farmers here a year, about 50% take them out and 50% don’t, most of the time they are sound but I have seen times when they weren’t sound and them times it was never just one animal that would go down. Better have them out than waiting for that one time.
60? That’s about 4 parishes.
 
How many loads between the 60 farms. You’d have to have every job in a 6 mile radius to have 60 farmers with slurry around here regardless of size.
I’d have to look at the book to see exactly, this is a good example though of what it is like in our area. In a 344 acre block there is 12 different farmers all with slatted tanks. If you go on the main road on the 1.2km stretch there is 6 tanks alone represented by the red circles and one yellow arrow as 2 lads are on top of eachother and just off the main road another 6 different farms circled with blue all with slatted tanks also.
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I’d have to look at the book to see exactly, this is a good example though of what it is like in our area. In a 344 acre block there is 12 different farmers all with slatted tanks. If you go on the main road on the 1.2km stretch there is 6 tanks alone represented by the red circles and one yellow arrow as 2 lads are on top of eachother and just off the main road another 6 different farms circled with blue all with slatted tanks also.
View attachment 133856View attachment 133857
An average of less than 30 acres per farm, I did not realise that farm size was actually that small. Those lads couldn’t have any more than 20-30k gallons of slurry each so. You’d want to nearly have a call out charge aswell.
 
An average of less than 30 acres per farm, I did not realise that farm size was actually that small. Those lads couldn’t have any more than 20-30k gallons of slurry each so. You’d want to nearly have a call out charge aswell.
On average here the sheds are usually a 4 bay single or a 3 bay double. So roughly 35 000 -54 000 gallons of slurry on average
 
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