Steel Thickness in Digger Bucket

lough

Well-Known Member
Does anyone know what thickness of steel is used in the bottom of a four foot digging bucket for a 13 ton machine. I need to replace the bottom in my bucket
 

Win

Well-Known Member
Does anyone know what thickness of steel is used in the bottom of a four foot digging bucket for a 13 ton machine. I need to replace the bottom in my bucket
Is it the same as the sides, 8 or 10mm?? :unsure:
 

lough

Well-Known Member
Is it the same as the sides, 8 or 10mm?? :unsure:

There is a hole at the back of the bucket high up in the curve and I was trying to measure the thickness there and I think it is 8mm. I might go with 10mm and I will have part of the sheet left over for another job.
 

drew

Well-Known Member
There is a hole at the back of the bucket high up in the curve and I was trying to measure the thickness there and I think it is 8mm. I might go with 10mm and I will have part of the sheet left over for another job.
Get a fully threaded bolt that will fit through it, wind a nut on all the way down then measure what’s left, then take nut off, put the bolt through the hole and put the nut on and measure the thread again and the difference between is the thickness
 

Bcl

Well-Known Member
6mm here in grading bucket of 8 ton. Too light, takes very little to dent it.
I'd use at least 10mm but be careful of strength of plate if buying some.
 

lough

Well-Known Member
Get a fully threaded bolt that will fit through it, wind a nut on all the way down then measure what’s left, then take nut off, put the bolt through the hole and put the nut on and measure the thread again and the difference between is the thickness

That's a useful tip for other things as well:Thumbp2: I must try that.
 

lough

Well-Known Member
6mm here in grading bucket of 8 ton. Too light, takes very little to dent it.
I'd use at least 10mm but be careful of strength of plate if buying some.

6mm would be 5mm more than what's in it at present. There was were straps added to the bottom and it was just patched up in a hurry a few times to keep going. The cutting edge needs replaced so will do the lot in one go.
 

Kieran97

Well-Known Member
My turf cutting bucket, the back was 8mm, the ends were 10mm and the hangers were 12mm with a 12mm gusset in the middle. That was for a 6 Ton digger, and the reason for the 8mm was to keep weight down.

I used a 12mm hardox cutting edge. I didn't use hardox in the bucket itself, as it was only going to be digging in very soft ground. For more stony soil id say go for s355 over s275 or S235. Not as dear as hardox, but more wear resistant than the standard stuff.

As regards plate thickness in your case, I'd be going for at least 10 given its a 13 ton digger. The extra cost of the thicker metal would be negligible I'd say.
 

Bcl

Well-Known Member
6mm would be 5mm more than what's in it at present. There was were straps added to the bottom and it was just patched up in a hurry a few times to keep going. The cutting edge needs replaced so will do the lot in one go.
Cheaper to buy a new bucket I'd say
 

lough

Well-Known Member
Cheaper to buy a new bucket I'd say

It would be and sell the old one, the only thing is I broke one of the teeth and half of the cutting edge came with it so no one would be keen on buying it, plus I already had the cutting edge bought when I realised that
 

Arthur

Well-Known Member
Get a fully threaded bolt that will fit through it, wind a nut on all the way down then measure what’s left, then take nut off, put the bolt through the hole and put the nut on and measure the thread again and the difference between is the thickness
That's a useful tip for other things as well:Thumbp2: I must try that.
Bit of a threaded bolt and a nut, just wind on the nut and put the threaded bit through till it starts to protrude at the other side and measure, all done in one measurement.
 

100-90DT

Well-Known Member
It would be and sell the old one, the only thing is I broke one of the teeth and half of the cutting edge came with it so no one would be keen on buying it, plus I already had the cutting edge bought when I realised that
It shouldn’t be hard repaired, in all fairness like you said anyway it’s nearly useless as it is. I’d use 10mm for the floor then fit 10 or 12mm wear strips to the bottom of the floor.(after all you can still keep an eye on wearstrips and replace as it wears down/close!) Have a digging bucket here the last 17 years digging Stoney ground and it’s not worn very much, I don’t see much need for wear resistant steel in this case, fair enough a 490 in a quarry or a crusher, unless it’s very abrasive ground/material you dig(silica sand) I don’t see much Need for it
 

lough

Well-Known Member
I finally got round to doing this job. It took me all yesterday evening to get the steel bend for the base. I was going to bend it with the digger and she wouldn't start, when I got her started and sit the quick hitch on it and put the full weight of the 13 ton digger on it, it wouldn't even bend it. I had to start then and cut a track in it with the angle grinder a few times and even then it took a bit of time to get it bent into shape
20210314_153144.jpg20210314_153132.jpg
 
Last edited:

100-90DT

Well-Known Member
I finally got round to doing this job. It took me all yesterday evening to get the steel bend for the base. I was going to bend it with the digger and she wouldn't start, when I got her started and sit the quick hitch on it and put the full weight of the 13 ton digger on it, it wouldn't even bend it. I had to start then and cut a track in it with the angle grinder a few times and even then it took a bit of time to get it bent into shape
View attachment 88862View attachment 88863
In the past I’ve welded steel into buckets like that just on the flat (without any bends) put the bucket onto the digger, then curled the bucket while heating it(I’ve done it mostly without heating it) while the buckets curled to shape then weld it in completely, always works a treat for me
 
Top