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Barrowsider

Well-Known Member
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We hadn’t planned on selling any of the spring born calves at the moment but after getting a few calls about the shorthorn cross heifers. Sold 4 of them this morning. Going for breeding apparently.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
You bought them ?

Buying calves , rearing them , and selling them as weanlings would be an excellent form of exercise
And a disastrous way to make a fortune .


"Dad, remember you told me that I could double my confirmation money if I bought those calves. Well I'm going on the school tour to France so I want my profits.

"There'd be about enough profit to get you to Roslare"
 

gone

Well-Known Member
No sign of the new outfit yet gone?
He was to have it ready a few days ago, and was to drop it out, but I heard nothing since. He was waiting on a set of brackets for the bucket grab. I am not registering it till January so will only start shouting then.
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
He was to have it ready a few days ago, and was to drop it out, but I heard nothing since. He was waiting on a set of brackets for the bucket grab. I am not registering it till January so will only start shouting then.

Belated Christmas present!!
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
slighty of topic but probably the best spot to get an answer.

Can cattle get black leg indoors ?

yesterday morning when doing the cubicles in the cow shed as I was scraping down towards a group of some incalf heifers , I saw one lying on the slats.one ear was slighty hanging.thought at worse they had knocked her or broken a leg.tried to get her up.checked to see had she full power in both legs.she was still sitting up but I went back to close the milkers into the collecting area.was back over to her in 3 mins max and noticed her rolling out a sort of and breathing labouring.to me she didn't have any sign of pneumonia.rang vet straight away and she was out in 15 mins.heifer was dying as she arrived in.
She says we'd have to get her into the lab today but I wasn't able to bring her till today.she said she'd open her.checked trachea for lung worm and the lungs for damage.all ok so she checked heart and liver.no sign of fluke or rumen fluke.
She thought the omentum didnt look right so sent a video of what she done to a colleague in the r.vet lab.
based on the video he said that the sudden on set of death and the state of the omentum that black leg couldnt be ruled out that it seemed to be something toxic took her.
Any ideas.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
slighty of topic but probably the best spot to get an answer.

Can cattle get black leg indoors ?

yesterday morning when doing the cubicles in the cow shed as I was scraping down towards a group of some incalf heifers , I saw one lying on the slats.one ear was slighty hanging.thought at worse they had knocked her or broken a leg.tried to get her up.checked to see had she full power in both legs.she was still sitting up but I went back to close the milkers into the collecting area.was back over to her in 3 mins max and noticed her rolling out a sort of and breathing labouring.to me she didn't have any sign of pneumonia.rang vet straight away and she was out in 15 mins.heifer was dying as she arrived in.
She says we'd have to get her into the lab today but I wasn't able to bring her till today.she said she'd open her.checked trachea for lung worm and the lungs for damage.all ok so she checked heart and liver.no sign of fluke or rumen fluke.
She thought the omentum didnt look right so sent a video of what she done to a colleague in the r.vet lab.
based on the video he said that the sudden on set of death and the state of the omentum that black leg couldnt be ruled out that it seemed to be something toxic took her.
Any ideas.
They can get it indoors but its not very common. Bacteria can come in on contaminated silage or bedding. A few years ago a lad close to here lost several and the blame was put on the mushroom compost that he was bedding with. We bedded with mushroom compost here for a few years and always vaccinated for it.
 

tanko

Active Member
If it was some sort of meningitis/listeriosis from mouldy silage you’d imagine it would take a few days at least to kill her. The suddenness of it would point towards some kind of clostridial infection, is there any clay in the silage?
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
If it was some sort of meningitis/listeriosis from mouldy silage you’d imagine it would take a few days at least to kill her. The suddenness of it would point towards some kind of clostridial infection, is there any clay in the silage?
no not that I've seen.72.9 dmd 27 dm silage.
vet was saying a bang or a small cut with them horsing around could be enough either
 

mixed fleet

Well-Known Member
no not that I've seen.72.9 dmd 27 dm silage.
vet was saying a bang or a small cut with them horsing around could be enough either
Lost a few over the years with blackleg even though we always vaccinate for it.
Always outside though, I think it's near impossible for an animal to recover from it.
My understanding of it is that the infection attacks the muscles, breaking them down and producing huge amounts of Toxin which poisons the animal.
Skin will feel "crinkley"
The dead animal will blow up massively within a hour or two of dying, again due to the toxins in their system.
 

Mf240

Well-Known Member
Lost a few over the years with blackleg even though we always vaccinate for it.
Always outside though, I think it's near impossible for an animal to recover from it.
My understanding of it is that the infection attacks the muscles, breaking them down and producing huge amounts of Toxin which poisons the animal.
Skin will feel "crinkley"
The dead animal will blow up massively within a hour or two of dying, again due to the toxins in their system.

He could of picked it up outside a couple of weeks back. If he got a knock or a belt it could trigger it off then.
 
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