Straw Spreaders / Bedders

Discussion in 'Machinery Matters' started by nashmach, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    Wondering does any one on here use one and what do they use?

    How are you getting on with it in terms of:
    Power requirement
    Quality of work
    Running costs


    TIA :thumbup1:
     
  2. jcb411abuser

    jcb411abuser Well-Known Member

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    forget about straw and get yerself some recycled wood chippings, has a little plastic in it aswell but when it's for the taking in the summer ye canny go wrong:thumbup: it's is great stuff for bedding stays really dry for ages and very easy worked with.

    off topic i know but just trying to send ye in the proper direction;), don't think many people know about the stuff so keep it under yer hats and it'll not jump to 100euro a load:sneaky2:
     
  3. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    Straw is on farm though from our tillage end - its not scarce either.....
     
  4. jcb411abuser

    jcb411abuser Well-Known Member

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    ah right:sweatdrop: shuda guess from the avatar :lol: don't know bout straw bedders, always used a grape meself, and for the bad years me hands and feet:crying:
     
  5. Merv_B

    Merv_B Well-Known Member

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    I really like the look of the spread-a-bale one as there would be less dust than the chopper models. Also you could alter the speed of the rotors if you had some straw with stones in.
     
    Blue Power likes this.
  6. Big Vern

    Big Vern Well-Known Member

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    think the old question has come up on many threads,
    we have a khun promor trailed job, we had a draw bar gfated on as the original had an axle but was 3 pt linkage mounted and wouldnt take 2 x round bales..
    since then its had a back door extension and now handles big sqaures as well.

    its the dogs piece of kit must be 12-13 year old gets a summer service and starts work about mid oct (weather dependant|) until end of april, (ish) every day at least 2 big bales some times 3-4, IMO it saves us time, and straw
    we dont have to blow straw over cattle as ours feed out side can be a bit dusty but its down by the time the cattle go back to lie and cud, also beds the sheep and knocks up barley straw for the feed pile, we run it on any thing we have availble although it can be a pain backing the 165 up hill in a shitty yard..
    oh and its had the shute re-designed a cupls times due to contact with solid objects... mainly on a dark morning when driver has had a hangover..:blushing:
     
  7. AYF

    AYF Well-Known Member

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    agree with big vern on the kuhn, only had ours 2 years but so far so good. recon the blower used about 3/4 to a tank of fuel on our jd 6610 between christmas and end of April used for at least 1 heston a day, and a few silage bales occasionally. definitely saved some straw for us, expensive stuff this end.
     
  8. Treemover

    Treemover Guest

    We have a Lucas. Old now, but very reliable. It's trailed, will blow silage or straw. Mf 575 can work it, but I have often had the 7740 on it's knees; but now I take it easier!!
    Changing knives is tough, usually get my fingers and knuckles cut to shreads!
     
  9. Blue Ray

    Blue Ray Well-Known Member

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    I don't have one, but its next on the shopping list, from what I've heard from local users the Lucas seem to be well built, but the local dealer has a few Kuhn machines about now too and they seem to be performing well. i was told by another dealer to be sure to buy the silage spec machine even if you don't want it to chop silage as it will have a heavier built drive train.
    This one doesn't look to bad for the money.
    http://www.thwhiteagriculture.co.uk/equipment.php?product_id=305
     
  10. denis086

    denis086 Well-Known Member

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    They seem like a great job-better dung less work cleaning out sheds etc but theyre an awful price we had a quick look around a while back but for the work we have for one it didnt make sense unless it was to be got very right :thumbup1:
     
  11. Jay Dee

    Jay Dee Well-Known Member

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    Have a Teagle here, does it's job fine in straw tho it struggles to turn the barrel with heavy bales of silage...new belts would help it but it's not used for silage here.

    If I was buying new I'd be looking at the Kuhn primor type design from Kuhn, Lucas or Teagle :001_unsure:.

    Would Nash not be after something mounted for a bit more manoeuvrability??
     
  12. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the replies.

    We wouldn't have the work to justify one really but keeping more stock and more sheds probably in the next 2 years or so and also to give my father a helping hand, I had thought about one of these second hand.

    I had thought of a Teagle Tomohawk or a Taarup 814 or similar as they seem to be cheapish.

    As Jay Dee says it would need to be mounted ideally but doubt the 3600 would handle any of these :001_unsure:
     
  13. kverneland es 80

    kverneland es 80 Well-Known Member

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    we run a jeantil bought it new off traynors 9 yrs old now mf 168 drives it just fine ours is straw only ,takes 2 round or 1 big sq ,would have prefered a teagle or lucas but big money at the time ,condon machinery in west cork sell a few english ones every year
     
  14. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    are you on about choppers or just blowers
    i used chopped straw in pens here and it was terrible when the straw was short,it just didnt make a decent bed

    long straw OTOH is good and less dust
     
  15. nashmach

    nashmach Well-Known Member

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    Well ideally it will need to be able to bed pens that are 35ft wide so I think it would have to be a chopper to fire it in that far? :confused1:
     
  16. AYF

    AYF Well-Known Member

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    kuhn type primor will handle that distance, no problem! without choping it up much. set the rpm's right and you won't get much dust either.
     
  17. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    ive little experience with chopper/blowers and i cant remember which 1 i used(may have been a kuhn) but that threw the straw easy 40ft and didnt chop it much

    could also use that 1 for round bale silage,but i really didnt see the point in that
     
  18. kverneland es 80

    kverneland es 80 Well-Known Member

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    35 ft about the limit of the jeantil :blushing:,doesnt chop just shreds the straw ,fast too:thumbup1:
     
  19. Rosie

    Rosie Well-Known Member

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    Spread-a-bale is Ok if you're able to 'drive it' into the bale & pick it up, but you'd need another loader tractor/telehandler to load it otherwise.
    Not sure how you'd cope with getting net wrap off round bales either. :001_huh:
    We had one on demo once & it's surprising how far it sticks out front. Some corners into sheds were a bit awkward to manoeuvre! :001_unsure:
    It didn't suit us anyways! :001_rolleyes:
     
  20. humungus

    humungus Well-Known Member

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    i have a LUCAS RAPTOR(mounted) for about 5 year now its never given me any bother in that time.It has a swiveling chute and will throw straw 55-60 feet easily.It doesn't chop the straw it just teases it into the blower and i reckon i save about forty bales a year its a pretty heavy machine and to get the best use from it you ideally would want a tractor you could leave it on for the winter that and the price of them are the only faults i would have with it.
     
  21. Larry David

    Larry David Very Senior Member

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    Those that have them, any respiratory problems with dust and any issues with flying stones?

    Anyone have experience of the straw spreading attachment for tub feeders, Strautmann and Hi-spec IIRC have it.
     
  22. headcase

    headcase Very Senior Member

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    suppose it goes without saying to move the beasts out whilst bedding:001_unsure:
     
  23. Big Vern

    Big Vern Well-Known Member

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    We are in the position that our cattle are moved before we bed, wouldnt want to bed over cattle with dust and stones..
    all our beef cattle go into big yards/ walk throughs while we fed and bed up

    know a bloke that beds over head hes hasnt hit one yet,,
     
  24. AYF

    AYF Well-Known Member

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    trouble with the waggons with a blower is that if you end up with some mix left behind (some waggons never empty properly) you end up blowing valuable feed under them, or you end up with straw left over and the hastle of what to do with it.
     
  25. humungus

    humungus Well-Known Member

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    no problems with stones or respiratory infections i bed the milkers while they are in the collecting yard but i blow it over the cattle while they are in the shed, after the first couple of times they hardly bat an eyelid
     

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