The grazing season

If they get till 3pm be doing well od say. Alot of that cover will be walked in
Try and send them out with a small bit of hunger when they are going to graze. No point having them going out if they aren't mad to graze. There will be a lot less walking and tramping done that way I find.
 
Try and send them out with a small bit of hunger when they are going to graze. No point having them going out if they aren't mad to graze. There will be a lot less walking and tramping done that way I find.
Ya they were fairly hungry this morning. They were a little tight last night for feed so worked out handy that way.
 
Back fencing and temporary spur roadways
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Tis not the weather apparently , but us lazy types and our cows that are the issue....
Them want some slap and add agriland to it aswell. Went out yesterday to a paddock to see could they go out and ground was squelching under foot. We have enough to be dealing with apart from these lot throwing their 2cent in to.
 
A quarter of my 2 yr old cattle out since last Monday on the driest field, a third of the yearlings out including a bunch of outliers that are out since mid February but the rest of them went back in today for the second time, outliers on outfarm and will be staying put, been over about a quarter of the grazing area, plenty of silage but barely 2 weeks slurry space, even took from one tank to another yesterday to gain a week there, all a bit of a balancing act.
 
Lost a suckler calf through pneumonia and poor stockmanship on my part during the week, barely caught another and its touch and go. They should be out weeks ago but majority of our grazing ground is physically under water. Very frustrating
 
Lost a suckler calf through pneumonia and poor stockmanship on my part during the week, barely caught another and its touch and go. They should be out weeks ago but majority of our grazing ground is physically under water. Very frustrating
These things happen, the best you can do is learn from it. Hope the other one recovers. Keep the head up, things will get better.
 
Housed all again today. Out since Sunday lighter stores and ploughing it up today. Made the decision shed till it finally dries up or I run out of silage and hay which will be next weekend. Eff this weather.
 
Lost a suckler calf through pneumonia and poor stockmanship on my part during the week, barely caught another and its touch and go. They should be out weeks ago but majority of our grazing ground is physically under water. Very frustrating
We are all doing our best, it’s a case of hanging on, lost a few over the last few weeks with another wave of pneumonia, settled again thankfully, but it’s been a hard winter on animals. I suspect there is a serious hangover of issues cattle have, since last summer
 
I was up the West in stone wall country between milkings today, bit of a mission. Anyways I was shocked to see the yellow colour on places. Very little if any fertiliser or slurry spread obviously. Very few stock out other than some sheep and an odd herd of dairy cows. And this would be the finest of land, around Tuam and Clategalway. You could travel some of this with heavy machinery twelve months of the year. I hate to say it but Teagasc may have a point. Obviously land is sodden in lots of parts of the country which are very badly affected with weather, but not everywhere is. It was 13 degrees here today, windy but not wet. If you were to believe the forecast today was to be a washout.
 
Cows in here today, yesterday evenings rain bolloxed things here. Ground is squelching when you walk it. Cows were out yesterday morning for about an hour and a half. It was long enough by what they did to the ground. I milked early yesterday afternoon in the hope of them grazing before the rain. The rain came, the cows didn't look to go out, straight to the cubicles they went. They would normally be at the gate looking to go out.
The more southern counties are getting it very rough the last 9 months weather wise I must say.
 
I was up the West in stone wall country between milkings today, bit of a mission. Anyways I was shocked to see the yellow colour on places. Very little if any fertiliser or slurry spread obviously. Very few stock out other than some sheep and an odd herd of dairy cows. And this would be the finest of land, around Tuam and Clategalway. You could travel some of this with heavy machinery twelve months of the year. I hate to say it but Teagasc may have a point. Obviously land is sodden in lots of parts of the country which are very badly affected with weather, but not everywhere is. It was 13 degrees here today, windy but not wet. If you were to believe the forecast today was to be a washout.
Land is gone cold looking around here in the last week, even places where got a good application of slurry/fertiliser a month ago.

I reckon allot of issues with air space in soil been saturated with water instead. Probably looking at all soils having slumped over the last 9 months, every bit of traffic over soil in this time period has caused compaction be it machine or animal.

Leaching of nutrients is a big concern, I have ground crying for sulphur and it’s too wet to travel with the tractor without marking. Next week might be the answer to our prayers
 
Land is gone cold looking around here in the last week, even places where got a good application of slurry/fertiliser a month ago.

I reckon allot of issues with air space in soil been saturated with water instead. Probably looking at all soils having slumped over the last 9 months, every bit of traffic over soil in this time period has caused compaction be it machine or animal.

Leaching of nutrients is a big concern, I have ground crying for sulphur and it’s too wet to travel with the tractor without marking. Next week might be the answer to our prayers
A good drought will sort it
 
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