the journal this week

Deeremassey

Well-Known Member
The storage period been moved to the 15th of Sept will affect a lot of people because the dept take in to account all the cattle in your herd during that period. So say for example a farmer that sells his cattle in mid Oct . These will b taking in account even though they will not be in the shed.
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
It's going to be along time storing from mid sept to march early April with cows going through a shed into the parlour.instead of trimming a month in the back end they could have put them month on in the spring.
Scandolous the videos that were doing the rounds last Jan / Feb on some of the ground that was been spread.if that wasn't a major pollution treath nothing will be
 

Johndeere3650

Well-Known Member
Contractor uses the pipes here to blow the slurry from my new shed to my slurry tower. Not everyone is breaking the rules with the pipes

Your case would be the minority. Most lads are out spreading on the land with the pipes.

Just out of interest how do they get the slurry up into the tower. Is there a connection at the bottom with a double valve to let slurry in or is there a steel pipe on the side of the tower or does the contractor lift one of his own pipes up the side of it? Never seen it done but heard of it being done
 

Rusty Spade

Well-Known Member
It's going to be along time storing from mid sept to march early April with cows going through a shed into the parlour.instead of trimming a month in the back end they could have put them month on in the spring.
Scandolous the videos that were doing the rounds last Jan / Feb on some of the ground that was been spread.if that wasn't a major pollution treath nothing will be
We haven't broken the bans here though at times it's tempting.

It's permitted but wrong to spread in February during poor weather but it's not permitted but correct to spread during dry periods of growthy weather at the start of January.
 
J

Joseph 88

Guest
Thats it exactly, maybe only 20% of farmers flouting the laws and now were all gonna suffer!
Id say 20% is being conservative. Had a large scale slurry contractor in twice at work. The lads took great pride in sharing that they only took Christmas day and new year's Day off as they were so busy at slurry
 

Ugo Schtiglitz

Well-Known Member
These rule changes all seem very blunt instruments to me. With the remote monitoring capability they have these days, they can see to within a foot where slurry has been spread. Surely with good weather forecasting, a system could be come up with where you could have a green light for spreading in certain areas at certain times of the year. And monitor that and throw the effing book at anyone who abuses it. There are weeks in August that are wetter than weeks in November. Just seems very blunt and dumbass. The idea to subsidise protected urea is crayon colouring book policy. There are other ways to reduce nitrogen use, that are simple and cultural, like clover and mss. Subsidising slurry seperation would be a better thing surely. Sometimes I think there has been a dept. brain drain, or they are struggling to keep up.
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
These rule changes all seem very blunt instruments to me. With the remote monitoring capability they have these days, they can see to within a foot where slurry has been spread. Surely with good weather forecasting, a system could be come up with where you could have a green light for spreading in certain areas at certain times of the year. And monitor that and throw the effing book at anyone who abuses it. There are weeks in August that are wetter than weeks in November. Just seems very blunt and dumbass. The idea to subsidise protected urea is crayon colouring book policy. There are other ways to reduce nitrogen use, that are simple and cultural, like clover and mss. Subsidising slurry seperation would be a better thing surely. Sometimes I think there has been a dept. brain drain, or they are struggling to keep up.
I had big hopes for this round of nitrates and had an expectation that the Department of Ag would do the correct thing to reduce leakage.

But it looks like the Lads from Upper Merrion Street were on the phone to same as.
 

thefarminglad

Well-Known Member
Only reason lads are spreading during closed periods is because they dont have enough storage. It would not take a lot for department to look up who has expanded cattle number wise in last 5 years for example and inspect them to check if they have enough storage. Should be part of area aid form, a section on how much storage you have and marked on maps where and if inspected and it does not match up then a heavy penalty.
 

Deerehunter

Well-Known Member
Only reason lads are spreading during closed periods is because they dont have enough storage. It would not take a lot for department to look up who has expanded cattle number wise in last 5 years for example and inspect them to check if they have enough storage. Should be part of area aid form, a section on how much storage you have and marked on maps where and if inspected and it does not match up then a heavy penalty.
when appling for derogation, a plan of yard with dimentions of loose sheds and capacities of slurry storage must be included in application. Had an inspection here for nitrates about 8 years ago and the dept inspector had all the information with him. He checked the dimentions of the tanks, looked at sheds to see they had concrete floors and checked every field to see if shite had been spread recently. It was Nov/Dec time.
 

TAFKAT

Well-Known Member
I had big hopes for this round of nitrates and had an expectation that the Department of Ag would do the correct thing to reduce leakage.

But it looks like the Lads from Upper Merrion Street were on the phone to same as.
Do you reckon all the top dogs in the Department are D4 pen pushers?
 

ts115

Well-Known Member
Only reason lads are spreading during closed periods is because they dont have enough storage. It would not take a lot for department to look up who has expanded cattle number wise in last 5 years for example and inspect them to check if they have enough storage. Should be part of area aid form, a section on how much storage you have and marked on maps where and if inspected and it does not match up then a heavy penalty.
A lad around here imported pig slurry and spread it in the closed period he had enough storage for his own cattle but not for his imported slurry, there will always be people that will break the law, the more I see of what some lads are up to I can only assume someone in the department has their back.
 

FIAT 450

Well-Known Member
So what's your answer to this conundrum for farmers?
How can we achieve reductions in emissions while keeping farming?
Trust us would be a start. And throw the book at the messers. These rules have taken away the farmers judgement and honestly in doing the thing right. You take zone a which is a big block of ground and add the extra amount of tankers in the country now to compared to before the bans came in alot of slurry is going out at once. An adding to storage is not going to do much. With all the maps and technology that's about why they can't allow X amount of slurry to be spread on ground that can carry it in what is the closed period, weather permitting of course instead of the flush of slurry at once.
 

Ugo Schtiglitz

Well-Known Member
Our nitrogen use efficiency NUE is chronic from applied bag N. Liquid is one way of reducing it, adding humate or buffering with organic material is another way. @Hardysplicer (cuts me a little to write that) had been working hard on an N product that was coated with a seaweed extract that allowed up to 20% reduced rates, with NO REDUCTION in yield, and there is trial work to back it. Why not make that compulsory?????? But no, protected urea will save us. The laziness in policy making and solution seeking is starting to rot my hole a bit. I have my suspicions that the nub of the problem is that when someone is making up regs and statutory instruments with huge commercial effects, they get on the phone to a research agency that is STILL in many areas, way behind the curve. Excuse my ranting, still have peas to cut.:taz:
 

FIAT 450

Well-Known Member
Our nitrogen use efficiency NUE is chronic from applied bag N. Liquid is one way of reducing it, adding humate or buffering with organic material is another way. @Hardysplicer (cuts me a little to write that) had been working hard on an N product that was coated with a seaweed extract that allowed up to 20% reduced rates, with NO REDUCTION in yield, and there is trial work to back it. Why not make that compulsory?????? But no, protected urea will save us. The laziness in policy making and solution seeking is starting to rot my hole a bit. I have my suspicions that the nub of the problem is that when someone is making up regs and statutory instruments with huge commercial effects, they get on the phone to a research agency that is STILL in many areas, way behind the curve. Excuse my ranting, still have peas to cut.:taz:
Would it be the case they want to take the intensity out of farming? Rather then seek solutions to maintain production
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
Are there any sanctions for a contractor who is found to be spreading outside the closed period?
Our piping lad said he asked a dept man a few yrs ago and was told that the contractor is not responsible if its in the closed period.

I would have thought the contractor would have got a wrap on the knuckles aswell for physically doing the job in the closed job.

Something else I didnt know either was a farmer and a digger driver can be find for cleaning out drains with water in them from march 1st til August 31st due to " possible nesting birds and frogs spawning and damaging their habitat "...
Teagasc person said that to me a few years ago and a plant hire man that @muckymanor worked for got into a bit of a handling with it
 
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