the journal this week

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
A few years ago there was savage dry weather after the new year.
It was said locally that if you rang the department told them your tanks were nearly full and the ground conditions were very very good then they checked out the case and gave you a yes or no answer.
This could be total shite tho I don't know
 

Rusty Spade

Well-Known Member
How close to final do people think that these new rules are at this stage?
End of year, I'd say.

There's a consultation going on now and then comes the discussion, the revised plans, the pointing out difficulties with the revised plans and possible solutions to them and then then the final submission to the EU for approval.
 

whelan1

Well-Known Member
A few years ago there was savage dry weather after the new year.
It was said locally that if you rang the department told them your tanks were nearly full and the ground conditions were very very good then they checked out the case and gave you a yes or no answer.
This could be total shite tho I don't know
Was also told it's a sure way of getting an inspection as you don't have enough storage
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
Are there any sanctions for a contractor who is found to be spreading outside the closed period?

Contractor will be prosecuted by the council if they are negligent. Contractors and all operating machinery for them, are supposed to know the rules regarding slurry spreading periods, buffer strips and so on. A contractor cant use the excuse - that the farmer told them to do it.

All above, depends on how stringent a local authority your operating in.
 

TAFKAT

Well-Known Member
Contractor will be prosecuted by the council if they are negligent. Contractors and all operating machinery for them, are supposed to know the rules regarding slurry spreading periods, buffer strips and so on. A contractor cant use the excuse - that the farmer told them to do it.

All above, depends on how stringent a local authority your operating in.
Has a contractor ever actually been prosecuted by a County Council for spreading slurry during the closed period
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
Has a contractor ever actually been prosecuted by a County Council for spreading slurry during the closed period
I can't say, actually nearly certain a slurry pipe contractor was taken to court in my County

I'm not going to say any more on the subject, for personal reasons 🙄
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
Was just wondering with the new regulations and all that there trying to enforce , im not a glanbia supplier but one might wonder at the timing of the an taisce new appeal and the environmental regs , is there collusion and both parties have the one thing in mind, no more expansion and we must use farming as their only a pain in the hole to the country to leave the country looking like a world leader in green policy
Just my own thoughts when milking this morning
 

Titan 8820

Well-Known Member
Has a contractor ever actually been prosecuted by a County Council for spreading slurry during the closed period
There was someone prosecuted in Co Cork a few years back. Taken to court and was fined (don’t know how much) for spreading in December.
The man told me himself. So it does happen, just probably not that often.
Same with hedging , landowner and contractor both fined.
 
J

Joseph 88

Guest
Was just wondering with the new regulations and all that there trying to enforce , im not a glanbia supplier but one might wonder at the timing of the an taisce new appeal and the environmental regs , is there collusion and both parties have the one thing in mind, no more expansion and we must use farming as their only a pain in the hole to the country to leave the country looking like a world leader in green policy
Just my own thoughts when milking this morning
Who are the two parties?
 

Barrowsider

Well-Known Member
As a rule, the EU does not grant derogation to countries with deteriorating water quality but has made an exception for Ireland due to our relatively high water quality. Hard to see that lasting.
 

Barrowsider

Well-Known Member
Historically this wouldn't be a big dairy area but nitrate levels have been high in groundwater for years due to the lighter nature of our soils. If we got zero rainfall in November and ground was dry as a bone it would still be madness to spread slurry because in the absence of growth, a couple of wet weeks in December or January will wash the nitrate through the soil profile and into the groundwater. Just because the tanker can travel doesn't mean it makes sense to spread. Around here, spreading in late January or early February is more sensible than in October as there is a greater chance of imminent growth to take up the nitrogen.
 
J

Joseph 88

Guest
Ah jesus. An taisce and government / dept of ag and environment
Didn't think you need to ask such a question.....would it not be sorta obvious
That's quite a reaction, Nothing is obvious as far as random conspiracy theories go. I had a feeling that's who you're referring to, but your reference to not being a glanbia supplier threw me off.
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
People think most of the green party are from mostly larger towns or city's.it could be thst alot of their policies are from rural members..
E.g. pippa living on a farm, chair of the party executive is living in an area thats the next thing to organic where you'd meet a sheep on the road sooner than another person or car.
You wouldn't know what their thoughts are re farming
 

Seedsower

Well-Known Member
The derogation is under serious threat, mostly due to deteriorating water quality in certain areas.
Whether farms need a derogation to farm profitably likely depends on individual costs but I would not like to base my future on its existence.
Maybe the government have been guilty of mis direction with their food harvest targets but that's not going to pay anyone's loans for them.
The whole glanbia vs an taisce thing seems completely wrong but is an indication of future thinking .
My main issue is if the majority of farms end up with higher costs due to the actions of a minority and that looks a likely scenario
 

Cows&biscuits

Active Member
A large numer of farms which are in derogation are in it to allow them to be viable at a full time scale, contrary to popular belief alot of them are in the sub 120 cow bracket. Talk of payments from Europe is rubbish as they won't pay any more than they are now and its milk out the gate that pays the bills, in the majority of cases. Would lads milk cows and work part time if dero goes, unlikely. Getting and paying for more land to maintain numbers, out of the same milk sales, also unlikely.
Dunno whats gonna happen and making decisions very difficult. It'll effect us all differently depending on stage of career etc
 
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