The youth of today, grumpy old men and nice women.

MF30

Well-Known Member
It's not really all youngsters really but absolutely everyone you talk to is in the same boat cannot get any help.
Contractors farmers, dealers, shops, hotels anyone can't get staff.
Where have all the lads that used to fill these rolls gone?
Lads won’t bother working long hours seven days a week when Aldi pay €15 per hour for clean work, the lads reckon they’re worth more than that into their hands. If they could get €20 hourly driving a tractor they’d be available quickly enough. Of course that won’t happen though, contracting rates would need to rocket.
 

Green Grass

Well-Known Member
alot of young lads are taking up with the sportfield as well .you could call it another waste of time .One lad was asking me to learn him to drive the tractor but I would have to pay him
 

Evan

Well-Known Member
I’m 22 been working with machinery as long as I had my license a lot of my friends from school and College did too I think I’m the only one left out of a bunch of 20 driving full time but to me it’s easy to see why young lads don’t want to go driving the hours and the money, it’s the nature of the job not knowing in advance when you’ll be working finishing at weekends etc it drives me mad at times too hard to have a social life I’m lucky to have a girlfriend from a hardworking family too who understands the long hours and the nature of the job, but I still have the opinion that if a contractor can’t get the job done within reasonable hours Monday to Saturday and maybe an odd Sunday when things are very busy they either have have too much work or not enough resources which is far too common around the country, money is the next problem and always will be it stems from the contractor not being paid enough in the first place because farmers can’t afford to pay anymore, there’s too many contractors not paying enough to their workers and tax paying is a mess payslips and the likes no one knows where they stand, in general these things I believe have given the job of driving machinery a bad look and a bad name over the last few years, I think I do it for the love of machinery climbing the ladder driving bigger and better machines and meeting people as we move around at jobs although I think it will wear off!, last year I bought a hedgecutter it was a huge eye opener for me but I enjoy working out the costs and what’s needed to run a machine, labour is becoming a problem but I definitely think it can be sorted by making the job more attractive for the workers.
 

bagenal

Well-Known Member
It's not really all youngsters really but absolutely everyone you talk to is in the same boat cannot get any help.
Contractors farmers, dealers, shops, hotels anyone can't get staff.
Where have all the lads that used to fill these rolls gone?
Always people in the local delis to fill rolls, things would be bad if ya couldn't get the auld breakfast roll :lol: 😂

On a serious note, answers to your question (spelling mistake accepted) people fed up of the long hours, poor pay and conditions, but some of the problem is lack of respect by ""employers"".
The situation with farmers/contractors is no certainty of employment, e.g. silage season gone to only a few weeks and especially this year where a lot of farmers had ample from the 1st cut and there are very few 2nd cuts at least around here. The other thing is that with all the rules, regulations about farm safety etc etc very few youngsters outside of family members are ever near a farm to learn about things, unlike me for instance where my mother was from a farming background and from around 8 I was hanging about the big farm over the road which kind of gave me an apprenticeship in farming and machinery.
Another issue for the other sectors you mention is again, like farming, the seasonality especially hotels in the areas dependant on tourism like down your way.
Some supermarkets and other types of retail only offer up to 20 hours per week spread over 7 days with the hourly rate is poor enough and the general public think it's great when politicians announce that x,y or z is creating so and so number of jobs but in reality the number should be at least halved because it's going to take 2 people to do the 40 hours 1 person should be doing to make up a full time job.
Also don't forget we're in a mini Celtic Tiger era with the building offering some good incomes even for unskilled people.
I'm not having a go at you or anyone else on here but some people on here wouldn't be tuned in to the situation out in the labour market because of not having to look for employment so don't see or have to concern themselves with the issues.
To get an idea of some of the precarious and badly paid "jobs" being touted sign up to the likes of indeed.com to get email alerts. A lot of ""employers"" mouth off about how difficult it is to get staff, no one is loyal any more, want too much for wages but these are the kind that wouldn't be happy if people worked for nothing and think people should bow before them. An employee is a stakeholder in a business and if treated properly will do their utmost to make it a success.
Apologises @TAFKAT , you liked before I added a bit so I hope I didn't make you dislike with it. 😁
 
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whelan1

Well-Known Member
See my daughter's friend is looking for a summer job. She only applied to places she would like to work. Daughter works in local shop on minimum wage of just over 7 euro an hour. It's only up the road so she can walk there. She's saving for a car and does about 30 hours a week.
 

TAFKAT

Well-Known Member
See my daughter's friend is looking for a summer job. She only applied to places she would like to work. Daughter works in local shop on minimum wage of just over 7 euro an hour. It's only up the road so she can walk there. She's saving for a car and does about 30 hours a week.
Couldn't blame her for that, If there's one thing the world certainly doesn't need any more of it's teenagers who would rather be anywhere other than the place they're working.
 

MF30

Well-Known Member
See my daughter's friend is looking for a summer job. She only applied to places she would like to work. Daughter works in local shop on minimum wage of just over 7 euro an hour. It's only up the road so she can walk there. She's saving for a car and does about 30 hours a week.
Is €7 hourly a minimum wage for a certain age? Couldn’t blame someone for only working at something they enjoy, I’ve often been served somewhere by someone who obviously doesn’t want to be there and a customer will notice it. I understand people will have to work at jobs they don’t want to but they need a wage and that’s understandable but you can’t beat a worker who enjoys their job.
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
It's not just contractors I know and talk to lads in all different walks of life can't get any help.
A guy was telling me today that an undertaker can't get anyone and the pay is very very good.
Shortage of truck drivers.
I know a builder and there is absolutely nobody doing the wet trades.
 

whelan1

Well-Known Member
I think it's €7.10 she gets home per hour. She's 17. She does enjoy the job as there's a bit of crack there between them. She was on under 7 euro an hour when she was 16. She's also learned alot. She works in the deli part, on the till, stacking shelves etc. Also dealing with the public can be an eye opener
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
Lads won’t bother working long hours seven days a week when Aldi pay €15 per hour for clean work, the lads reckon they’re worth more than that into their hands. If they could get €20 hourly driving a tractor they’d be available quickly enough. Of course that won’t happen though, contracting rates would need to rocket.
Like I said in the post I'm not on about just driving tractors it's absolutely every industry
 

MF30

Well-Known Member
I think it's €7.10 she gets home per hour. She's 17. She does enjoy the job as there's a bit of crack there between them. She was on under 7 euro an hour when she was 16. She's also learned alot. She works in the deli part, on the till, stacking shelves etc. Also dealing with the public can be an eye opener
The experience alone is worth more than the wage.
 

MF30

Well-Known Member
Like I said in the post I'm not on about just driving tractors it's absolutely every industry
The amount of lads clued onto their friends who are on every benefit available to them is increasing daily, some just don’t mind being useless.
 

TAFKAT

Well-Known Member
It's not just contractors I know and talk to lads in all different walks of life can't get any help.
A guy was telling me today that an undertaker can't get anyone and the pay is very very good.
Shortage of truck drivers.
I know a builder and there is absolutely nobody doing the wet trades.
I don't think there was ever a glut of staff when it comes to undertakers in fairness, it's one of those jobs were you really have to grow up with it, no money would pay you in my opinion.
 

TAFKAT

Well-Known Member
There are hundreds of ways or making a living now that weren't there 20 years ago. When I was doing the Leaving Cert there were a heap of lads in my class who would have loved to pursue a career in sport but the choices were basically either a professional footballer or a P.E. teacher, now there all sorts of other avenues to explore. I came home the other evening and there was a glamourous looking girl standing out in a field of stubbles having her photograph taken, she makes her living out of modelling clothes on Instagram or some other platform. My father was talking to an agri mechanic last week and his son is a computer game designer, making a lot more money, always clean and never has to leave the house. Anyone who wants to work hard for the sake of it is some type of masochist, making money is the whole point of the exercise.
 

Nashty

Well-Known Member
There are hundreds of ways or making a living now that weren't there 20 years ago. When I was doing the Leaving Cert there were a heap of lads in my class who would have loved to pursue a career in sport but the choices were basically either a professional footballer or a P.E. teacher, now there all sorts of other avenues to explore. I came home the other evening and there was a glamourous looking girl standing out in a field of stubbles having her photograph taken, she makes her living out of modelling clothes on Instagram or some other platform. My father was talking to an agri mechanic last week and his son is a computer game designer, making a lot more money, always clean and never has to leave the house. Anyone who wants to work hard for the sake of it is some type of masochist, making money is the whole point of the exercise.
You won't be short of help tilling that field of stubbles if she is modelling there when you are tilling it @TAFKAT
 

c4l

Well-Known Member
did my bit over the first cut. was happy to get it. i dont go actively searching for work tbh when i should. i spose when spring stuff is getting cut and maybe maize season, i would probably try. way i did things was if i got a phone call, i'd go. there were 4 guys ive driven for over the first cut when they were short drivers plus doing the odd job for my old man and whatever bit with our own tractor and trailer for others. past few weeks been quiet for me so im just tipping around the yard trying to get the baler and tractors serviced or chasing after calves down the road.
the lads i worked for are well able to pay in their own ways. one seems low on the per hour rate but is cash in hand after the job is done which i appreciate. 30 euro after 3 hours work wrapping some bales and i know id get it when im finished, i'll happily take it especially when he would give you advanced notice of when he wants you and was understanding of whatever situation whenever it came to what other jobs i was booked for (and of course some needed funds to go down to AJ's). the work he gave me was something you could easily slot in for and hour or 2 on the way home (if finished by 6pm) or get done right away.
when it comes to the others, you'd have to wait but thats usually the nature of this business
 

Rusty Spade

Well-Known Member
I saw a sign up in the local town for blocklayers at €20-21/hour. I thought that was good enough money, though I'm assuming all the required boxes and certs must be provided first?
 

Masseyrk662

Well-Known Member
8 years since I done my leaving cert. 5 of the lads that were in my year are still driving tractors full time for contractors but I’d say if they got married or had a child that would be over. I wouldn’t let anyone under 18 or not in leaving cert drive tractors for contractors anyway. I do hear a lot of the craic going on at school and I would think a lot of lads anyway aren’t mature enough to drive big tractors on hire at that age.
A lot of the country lads around here (age 15-18) spend the summer at turf or power washing sheds or general farm work, some do be working on sites, maybe I’m bias to some extent but the lads from towns don’t seem to do anything
 

paddysdream

Well-Known Member
Normally just read the stuff on here and rarely if ever reply but have seen this from both sides .

Whenever I need help here with sheep or cattle will ALWAYS pay no matter who it is .Usually get a couple of young lads for minimum of half a day.Not much point in asking someone to come for an hour as its not much use to either party .Pay tenner an hour for say 15/16 year old to help at shearing ,testing cattle etc .Thats from when they land in the yard till they leave ,dinner included if necessary .Family no different ie would give my nephews or young lad the same .
A few times have had a farming father tell you "shur you are only spoiling my young lad by paying him that ,how will I get him to do anything for me ."
Well if they do the work they are entitled to the wage .Always make a point of paying the lad on the way home -none of this thing of will drop it into you next time I'm up that way .Amazing the power of a bit of John Cash in the hand to a young fella .
Have never had a problem getting someone at short notice within reason.
Would usually try to arrange it a few days beforehand if possible .

On the other hand have often had people ring up looking for someone to follow a machine for a day/week etc .
This is grand until you ask when and for how long .Ringing at 11pm at night wondering how are you fixed for 7am tomorrow .These wouldn't be things that appeared out of the blue so no excuse really .
For example man about 2 miles away rang me end of May asking was I busy .About 9 am . Said I was tapping in a few stakes but anyways .Wondered if I could draw silage for a day with his tractor .Said grand and asked when .He said that as soon as the young buck was finished filling the harvester they were going to start picking up-about half an hour's time .
Told him no bother- 25 an hour cash in hand from when I landed till we had the last load done .He seemed to get cold feet at that suggestion and wondered if I wasn't a wee bit dear .I said I valued my time and rate here is 20 an hour normally but 25 for special orders .He informed me that he pays 12 an hour to his drivers and not to say anything.

25 an hour sound excessive OK but then again like I said thats a one day rate .No real issue if its a months work the rate would be very different but someone expecting to get a "responsible " adult to work 15/18 hours a day with responsibility for c.100k of machinery for 12 an hour at the drop of a hat is living in a different world to the one I am in .

There is pucks of work out there for a person prepared to work for nothing .Even at 20 an hour would have more than enough to fill out all the slack times in a drystock farmers calendar .
 

CavanJacks

Well-Known Member
On the contractor & farmer front I don't buy it,re the claimed lack of available labour. Donedeal.ie has ads from lads looking for farm work, milking & machinery mainly & lots more looking to drive tractors all year round.rarely see contractors looking for a tractor driver.

Agree with op on building tradesmen & skilled workers are in demand & short supply. Unfortunately our economy is full of so called jobs. Just take a look on indeed, & the rate of pay on offer,in many cases, accompanied by a shortlist of requirements from the company on the workers. Mainly factory environment. It's a wonder they get any staff.

The cost of living needs tackling here. Car insurance which is a must for most workers, esb & housing for all who need it.
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
I saw a sign up in the local town for blocklayers at €20-21/hour. I thought that was good enough money, though I'm assuming all the required boxes and certs must be provided first?
They can't get lads at that money.
There warning far more putting up walls, or the odd house at a per block rate.
 
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