Which tracked digger?

Kieran97

Well-Known Member
Have you a budget in mind @johndeere6920s, would help clarify what sort of machine would be suggestible

Also may I ask why are you thinking you need rubber tracks. I wouldn't think a lot of them
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
Have you a budget in mind @johndeere6920s, would help clarify what sort of machine would be suggestible

Also may I ask why are you thinking you need rubber tracks. I wouldn't think a lot of them
I don't have a budget because I'm not buying at the minute or the near future but I'd like to keep an eye on them obviously the cheaper the better but I know nothing about diggers so wouldn't want a bad yoke either.
Why I'm thinking rubber tracks is again doing a job in around the back of a house ect
 

Win

Well-Known Member
Having run the following
kubota 2.8t
Hitachi 3t
Nissan 4.1t
sumitomo 6t
JCB 13t
Hyundai 14t
Samsung 22t

I can say an 8 t machine is neither handy or capable,when you get onto a 13t machine after one you think why did I bother,they don’t have the reach or weight to do any real work “what can do a lot can do a little”
Don't agree with that comment at all, depends what you're doing to what size machine you need. Do you use a sledge hammer to hit staples in when fencing?:hammer:
 

Bot.exe

Well-Known Member
I hire an ex60-5 on steel tracks with a blade every now and again and I can get a lot of work done with it. It will load into a 14t dump trailer on level ground but the bucket will be close to full crowd and you can't go full chat when slewing. I have used it in and around the yard and under sheds where a 13t wouldn't be practical. Controls are nice and plenty of power for its size. Definitely not compatible to a 12/13t machine though.

I agree with @Mike that a 4.5t machine would suit better for what you are talking about.
A much more nimble machine and would suit lawns and small work better, an 8t machine is an awkward size in my opinion
 

scoffcruddle

Well-Known Member
Don't agree with that comment at all, depends what you're doing to what size machine you need. Do you use a sledge hammer to hit staples in when fencing?:hammer:
But you can’t knock a fence post in with a claw hammer.🔨😆
I use my little kubota for all small and finer jobs the downside with smaller diggers is not the digging it’s the loading,they don’t have the lift height or reach,I haven’t a trailer on the farm my kubota can fill,only thing it fills is the loadalls bucket or a hooklift bin on the deck.

The only downside with a 13t machine is the cost for a decent trailer to move it,smaller stuff can ramp into a tipper or such.

Reality is in an ideal world you need a digger of every size,an 8t machine with an extra dig boom would be a half decent machine,it would certainly be better at loading the higher dump trailers that are becoming the trend.
 

d8666

Well-Known Member
Another point to this if you are doing hire work in comparison to someone who operates a digger week in and week out most people who spend a few days here and there are very average in comparison when doing more complicated work than loading trailers or cleaning drains.
It’s lovely to watch an experienced operator in action with the throttle opened up to the max.
 

jf 850

Well-Known Member
I don't have a budget because I'm not buying at the minute or the near future but I'd like to keep an eye on them obviously the cheaper the better but I know nothing about diggers so wouldn't want a bad yoke either.
Why I'm thinking rubber tracks is again doing a job in around the back of a house ect

You mention lawns and around house work .
You will be busy with bales and slurry when you are wanted at that sort of gig . No one will want you doing lawns for the last month , nor until next March , which is when is your quiet period .
While those jobs can be lucrative , it suits a person with groundwork skills , more so than tractor driving etc .
The ability to lay pipework, galleys, levels is the important part of that job.

Some people will have these skills
And as others have stated here , for that sort of market , you cant beat an experienced operator.
Its not a case of giving the job to someone because , " He is €6 an hour cheaper , than Mick , who has been at that work for 30 years ".

Not raining on your parade. Just pointing out the pitfalls .
Anyone lad " who will work for nothing with a 13 ton digger ," in your words , will always get a certain amount of work moving heaps of clay , digging out yards etc , but he is rarely better value than the experienced driver, after you have paid for the extra time to do it , stone or concrete.
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
An experienced operator probably wont be running at full throttle.
The opposite. The operator that lacks experience wont be neat and tidy at full throttle because they won't have the control, so will run it at lower throttle and make several passes with the bucket. The experienced driver will operate a track machine at full throttle and his experience will allow him to be neat and tidy at high speed.
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
You mention lawns and around house work .
You will be busy with bales and slurry when you are wanted at that sort of gig . No one will want you doing lawns for the last month , nor until next March , which is when is your quiet period .
While those jobs can be lucrative , it suits a person with groundwork skills , more so than tractor driving etc .
The ability to lay pipework, galleys, levels is the important part of that job.

Some people will have these skills
And as others have stated here , for that sort of market , you cant beat an experienced operator.
Its not a case of giving the job to someone because , " He is €6 an hour cheaper , than Mick , who has been at that work for 30 years ".

Not raining on your parade. Just pointing out the pitfalls .
Anyone lad " who will work for nothing with a 13 ton digger ," in your words , will always get a certain amount of work moving heaps of clay , digging out yards etc , but he is rarely better value than the experienced driver, after you have paid for the extra time to do it , stone or concrete.
No fear of that I'm gifted at everything
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
I dont tink full throttle in a digger is any advantage other than if you like burning diesel

As above that was my point.
Talk to any dealer or research any manufacturer. Most modern track machines are made to run fully open. Thats why theres an automatic idler on them. Running them below full throttle means that they don't warm up to working temperature in the same manner as the manufacturer designed them to. Its harder on the engine. Its harder on pumps and seals. Yes, its OK to run one for periods of time at reduced throttle for specific jobs but for jobs that require them to use their full hydraulic power such as digging, loading or levelling, they are designed to run full tilt. You don't run a PTO implement designed to run at 540rpm at 400 rpm continuously. You can, but you may shorten its life.
 
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johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
Talk to any dealer or research any manufacturer. Most modern track machines are made to run fully open. Running them below full throttle means that they don't warm up to working temperature in the same manner as the manufacturer designed them to. Its harder on the engine. Its harder on pumps and seals. Yes, its OK to run one for periods of time at reduced throttle for specific jobs but for jobs that require them to use their full hydraulic power such as digging, loading or levelling, they are designed to run full tilt. You don't run a PTO implement designed to run at 540rpm at 400 rpm continuously. You can, but you may shorten its life.
If its harder on the engine and harder on the pumps would that not mean it would get hotter?
Would you run a rake or a haybob at 540?
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
If its harder on the engine and harder on the pumps would that not mean it would get hotter?
Would you run a rake or a haybob at 540?

No. The engine and pumps and oil need to be brought to a specific temp for optimum working. The cooling system keeps them at this temp. Running cooler than the required temp means greater wear.

What is the recommended rmp for a rake? New haybob here last year says do not run above 330rpm. Would you run your mower or hedge cutter at 400rpm?
 
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johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
No. The engine and pumps need to be brought to a specific temp for optimum working. The cooling system keeps them at this temp. Running cooler than the required temp means greater wear.

What is the recommended rmp for a rake? New haybob here last year says do not run above 330rpm. Would you run your mower or hedge cutter at 400rpm?
I'm not going to get into this because it's pointless.
It won't run cooler if you have it at less revs it will run at much the same temp that's what the thermostats and temp sensors do.
540 max so anywhere from tick over to 540 for example if your in extremely rough ground your not Going to have the rake going full pelt.
Run mowers anywhere from 850 to 1000 rpm as in light crops you need to lower your speed to stop it blowing the crop ahead of itself.
Yes I run the hedgecutter below 540 rpm
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Instead of debating with me, stick it into google. You will see that the main manufacturers recommend running hydraulic excavators at full throttle.

And if you ever have a lad on your land cleaning up drains and running his track machine on 75% of throttle, run him out the gate because he's either useless or taking you for a ride.


I'm not going to get into this because it's pointless.
It won't run cooler if you have it at less revs it will run at much the same temp that's what the thermostats and temp sensors do.
540 max so anywhere from tick over to 540 for example if your in extremely rough ground your not Going to have the rake going full pelt.
Run mowers anywhere from 850 to 1000 rpm as in light crops you need to lower your speed to stop it blowing the crop ahead of itself.
Yes I run the hedgecutter below 540 rpm
 

Joseph 88

Active Member
Instead of debating with me, stick it into google. You will see that the main manufacturers recommend running hydraulic excavators at full throttle.

And if you ever have a lad on your land cleaning up drains and running his track machine on 75% of throttle, run him out the gate because he's either useless or taking you for a ride.
Not sure how familiar you are with modern excavators but many I have come across have different work modes, Volvo,Cat,Hitachi and John Deere to name a few. If what you were saying was true, there'd be no need for them.

And as for your last post, that's just not true. The tidiest operator i've ever seen spends his days doing cow paths and forestry roadways, Works a 22t machine and it's never running over 75%. Running a machine wide open when it's not needed does nothing but waste diesel.
 

Thomas8210

Well-Known Member
One of these is what you need. Never used to be impressed by 6 tonners until we tried a neighbour who got a - 3 with long dipper and blade and really liked it. Has power stability and reach. Side by side with a zx130, theres only 3 foot of reach difference. Alot of times men are wasting there time and diesel by running a 13 tonner. We mostly run the 60 full throttle in eco mode, only on heavy clay digging would we put her into power mode. On a heavy days digging she will usually use around 40-50l of fuel, so not hard to run. Handier for cleaning out sheughs as you are able to sit closer, can dig inside sheds, we have dug a few tanks out inside sheds which was no problem l, couldn't have done it with a 130. 60 is small enough to work around a house. Its a downsized 120 whereas alot of modern ones are glorified 2.8 tonners. Its not massively worked, only does 1000-1200 hours a year but reliabilty has been excellent, just needed new batteries and a starter. Honestly cant fault these. Having used both this and various 13 tonners on a mixture of site and farm work, i would take this everyday. If i did need bigger than this i would probably go for a 160 or 180 tbh
IMG_20200703_142103.jpg
 

muckymanor

Well-Known Member
Not sure how familiar you are with modern excavators but many I have come across have different work modes, Volvo,Cat,Hitachi and John Deere to name a few. If what you were saying was true, there'd be no need for them.

And as for your last post, that's just not true. The tidiest operator i've ever seen spends his days doing cow paths and forestry roadways, Works a 22t machine and it's never running over 75%. Running a machine wide open when it's not needed does nothing but waste diesel.

Fairly familiar having driven a few for a while and been involved in some repairs. Work modes are different to getting into a cab and choosing to only put the throttle up 3/4 of the way. Sure there would be no need for work modes if track machines were built to run on half or 3/4 throttle for the day. The work mode reduces engine running speed but keeps the pumps running at the same speeds - On the volvo that I have driven with work modes, you can choose work modes for different things. eg. A mode for digging where full power is required from the pumps. A mode for levelling where you need the pumps to work at the same speed as digging but they don't need to be as powerful so they run on reduced engine revs. The computer sensors can run the engine at lower revs but keep the pumps at the same speed. But have you ever gotten into a digger with no sensors and turned down the revs? What happens? Everything runs slower. The arms move slower, the slew is slower and there is less digging power.

I don't doubt your testament to the 22t machine driver. The best driver I know spent years working on contract for Irish Rail on a Kobelco 135 and it never ran at more than 50% because it never had to-rather it was a case of doing as little as possible IYKWIM. But when he went onto land work and was being paid by the hour, he ran it at 100% throttle, 100% of the time. But I'll just ask you 1 question about this 22t machine driver - was he charging the forestry 75% of the going rate for his 22t machine? If he was as good as you say he is, then surely he could do 25% more work by running the machine at its full capacity? And then, on the other hand, if he was only running the machine at 75%, would he not be better running a machine that was 25% smaller. It would be easier on fuel, cheaper on parts and cheaper on depreciation?
 
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