Will there be a grant system after TAMS II

deere6320

Well-Known Member
Just wondering people’s opinions on whether there will be a farm infrastructure grant system after TAMS 2 finishes, I’m currently still in secondary school but I have plans to convert to dairying in the near future which would really benefit from a grant, but by the time I’m ready to start it will most likely be 2025-2026, all opinions welcome ,thanks
 

Cork

Well-Known Member
Just wondering people’s opinions on whether there will be a farm infrastructure grant system after TAMS 2 finishes, I’m currently still in secondary school but I have plans to convert to dairying in the near future which would really benefit from a grant, but by the time I’m ready to start it will most likely be 2025-2026, all opinions welcome ,thanks
I’m only speculating but I’d expect that grants (if any) going forward will be aimed at pollution reduction.

So, while you might not get a grant for a parlour, cubicles or grazing infrastructure, you might get a grant to help reduce pollution (slurry storage, feed additives etc).

In addition, the EU/Irish government will have a lot of financial wounds to heal following Covid so I’d expect any grants will be hard got.

Just my thoughts.
 

Will I Am

Well-Known Member
If you are 5 years away I wouldnt be overly worried about it. Presumably that time will be spent gaining some form of qualification. Im sure there will be grants available in some form but might be more tied to environmental schemes.
Dairying might not be as attractive in 5 years who knows.

I wouldnt be pinning all my hopes on grants though as the requirements might not suit what you want to do. Plenty lads get into dairying without grants. Focus more on efficiencies and utilize what you have.
 

deere6320

Well-Known Member
Do u think that because of the new rules regarding cow numbers, that starting up a herd with 60-70 cows won’t be allowed?
 

Joseph 88

Well-Known Member
Do u think that because of the new rules regarding cow numbers, that starting up a herd with 60-70 cows won’t be allowed?
I can't imagine any restrictions like that being implemented, Now whether it would be possible to justify repayments on a herd that size might be a different story.

Getting a processor to collect a smaller volume might be more difficult.
 

Bot.exe

Well-Known Member
Stick at the sucklers and get a good job or a trade. If you see a bunch of farmers running towards something, turn around and run in the opposite direction
This is great advice, you might have the farming bug now but the land isn't going anywhere. Get a qualification under your belt and spread your wings for a year or two. You might be able to buy a turnkey dairy setup in a few years, I doubt every new entrant will stick with it.
 

jay gatsby

Well-Known Member
I’m 16 ,I feel that the money does not justify sucklers and I want to farm full time and at home, I have experienced dairying and I know that’s what I want
Go for it but in the name of god get the Leaving done.
I'd keep away from grant spec generally at the size you are talking about. You'll pick up a beaut of a modern second hand parlour over the next 5 years from someone scaling up or getting out and you can get a lot of units and make a right job of it. Grant's going could be your best friend as it will take the heat out of the trade and builders might be more available. Tanks for the environmental side might be the one to think about as the lads have said, capacity is going to be a big issue.
 

deere6320

Well-Known Member
Go for it but in the name of god get the Leaving done.
I'd keep away from grant spec generally at the size you are talking about. You'll pick up a beaut of a modern second hand parlour over the next 5 years from someone scaling up or getting out and you can get a lot of units and make a right job of it. Grant's going could be your best friend as it will take the heat out of the trade and builders might be more available. Tanks for the environmental side might be the one to think about as the lads have said, capacity is going to be a big issue.
Appreciate it, I’ve done the figures with grant and non grant spec and no matter how much you try to minimise costs, it’s still a massive expense to get into milk, but I guess that’s what it takes
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
Get an education and a trade after the leaving and go see the world and life's good and bad points before you get tied to the tail and do your travelling and partying when your young.land will neither disappear or burn till you return to it
 

deere6320

Well-Known Member
Get an education and a trade after the leaving and go see the world and life's good and bad points before you get tied to the tail and do your travelling and partying when your young.land will neither disappear or burn till you return to it
That sounds fine but I’m afraid the opportunity for small scale farms will be no existant in 10/15 years and I’ll have missed the window
 

Cork

Well-Known Member
Appreciate it, I’ve done the figures with grant and non grant spec and no matter how much you try to minimise costs, it’s still a massive expense to get into milk, but I guess that’s what it takes
How many acres are owned and is it in one block?

Get your leaving done and keep cool. You’ll be a young lad and there are plenty of years ahead.

Knowing what I know now, a good education is priceless. The land will be there so take your time.
 

deere6320

Well-Known Member
How many acres are owned and is it in one block?

Get your leaving done and keep cool. You’ll be a young lad and there are plenty of years ahead.

Knowing what I know now, a good education is priceless. The land will be there so take your time.
85 acres in one block ,75 are workable ,10 acres complete bog
 

Cork

Well-Known Member
85 acres in one block ,75 are workable ,10 acres complete bog
Starting up from scratch must surely cost a fortune.
Unless you have a lot of cash, the borrowing will be very big and you’ll be subject to variable interest rates for many years.
We are in a period historically low interest rates at the moment, that won’t last forever.

Don’t even try planning for the moment as I think you will be tying yourself down at too young an age by getting into cows/loans straight after the leaving.
Get some world experience on farms etc before doing anything.
 

Will I Am

Well-Known Member
Do u think that because of the new rules regarding cow numbers, that starting up a herd with 60-70 cows won’t be allowed?
I dont think you will be prevented from starting a herd at all but i expect land type, management and area your in will become more relevant when qualifying for grants. With the land reclamation and drainage work you discussed on other threads I wonder will it be compatible with environmental grant requirements (when they do come in). Im not at all trying to put you off, you just have to go with whats there at the time and try and get the best out of it whether that be with a grant or without a grant.
 

towbar

Well-Known Member
That sounds fine but I’m afraid the opportunity for small scale farms will be no existant in 10/15 years and I’ll have missed the window
I disagree, I think the opportunity for small scale farms will improve as the focus shifts to environmental friendly and organic. I suggest you find a niche to go after do your research. As others have said do your leaving and make sure you get a broad perspective. If you think there will be no small farms dairying in 10-15 yes why jump into that space?
 

Will I Am

Well-Known Member
That sounds fine but I’m afraid the opportunity for small scale farms will be no existant in 10/15 years and I’ll have missed the window
Do you plan on getting out again in 10/15 years? Or maybe you hope to increase scale in that time.
 

Kieran97

Well-Known Member
With the numbers and acreage you have suggested, I wonder how viable it will be?

You're talking about a substantial capital investment and you're tied to it.
We farm similar acres, drystock, buy and sell bullocks mind you, and I'd never dream of being at it full time.

If you were to work outside, maybe go the contract rearing route, you wouldn't need the big investment costs with setting up for milking. There are people on this forum contract rearing on acres similar to what you have suggested. You have a regular steady Income without having to invest. You have the farm as a sideline without being tied to it, and it leaves you with more options.

When I was 16 I hadn't planned doing what I did (I'm 23 now), I wasnt even going to study the same thing in college that time.

Once you take the plunge into dairying and borrow money, you have to stick with it. With the dry stock you can change course if the wind takes you that way.
 
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