Will there be a grant system after TAMS II

diesel power

Well-Known Member
My advice is do your leaving. Go to college. Get pissed, chase girls and enjoy your youth. I'm working all my life farming and there's times the days melt together under the workload but I love what I do. I did my 3rd level and did a stint in America as part of that and it's the best thing I ever did. I met and made some great friends from it all and I still chat to some of them to this day. A few of them are here and I'm sure would echo what I've said.
The farm and the work will always be there but your youth won't.
 

Bog Man

Well-Known Member
In your mind you are comparing school and milking cows but as you go forward in life it will be between other things and milking cows . If I had a choice between school and milking cows I would milk cows .
Whatever experiences you get after your leaving cert such as college travelling and generally acting the maggot will make you better at milking cows.
 

Soissons

Well-Known Member
Get out into the world while you can.You will always regret not doing things more than doing things. Do your leaving and green cert, you’re going to need the green cert no matter what. Know that coming from a farming background, you have far more skills than you appreciate at the moment. I still have great memories of my time working on farms and travelling in France , Australia, Canada, and England 40 years ago and I find it hard to remember what I did 10years ago! I got one job travelling around Europe as part of the sponsors support team for a yacht race. Before I arrived it took them 3 hours to put up the exhibition stands for the sponsors product. After I arrived, we did it in half an hour. None of the others had ever worked a spanner before! Finally, take note of all the previous posts. Posts written by lads with great wisdom and experience. Good luck what ever you decide.
 

indecisive sort

Well-Known Member
i know someone in particular here, a very good dairy operator near retirement. started farming in his teens, all he wanted to do at the time was farm. and to this day his biggest regret is not seeing other sides of life when he had a chance.

Once you take that first big loan out, its going to be a very long road from 16

the culture was very different back then , most fells were under a lot of pressure from their fathers to get to work on the farm as quick as possible , a decent education was ignored , never mind a gap year abroad
 
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ponderosa

Well-Known Member
the culture was very different back then , most fells as were under a lot of pressure from their fathers to get to work on the farm as quick as possible , a decent education was ignored , never mind a gap year abroad
yep. i know of 1 or 2 that didn't want to farm but had no choice but leave school..

i think this young man 'OP' loves farming so much right now that he doesn't want to think of anything outside of it. i was that way too but now 30 years later, I'm so glad i had to take the long way to farming. i didn't give up on farming, just kept tweaking the dream year by year seeing what other lads were doing even outside of farming gave me ideas.
 

indecisive sort

Well-Known Member
yep. i know of 1 or 2 that didn't want to farm but had no choice but leave school..

i think this young man 'OP' loves farming so much right now that he doesn't want to think of anything outside of it. i was that way too but now 30 years later, I'm so glad i had to take the long way to farming. i didn't give up on farming, just kept tweaking the dream year by year seeing what other lads were doing even outside of farming gave me ideas.

that generation ( or many of them ) of farmers saw sons as being born to carry buckets of milk first and foremost
 

Canyon

Member
I went off and got a degree and an office job in a totally unrelated field if you'll pardon the pun.

I'm now at home milking cows fulltime while doing a few days a week in the office.

I am absolutely useless with my hands.

If I could go back and talk to my younger self I would have done a trade first.

Many of my contemporaries who did a trade progressed onto a related degree with the practical foundation provided by the apprenticeship to help carry them through.

I wouldn't recommend working in a totally unrelated industry at least try and have the skills be somewhat cross transferable.

Neither my degree nor my 'job' are in anyway related and having to cultivate a knowledge base and stay current in two completely different spheres will leave your head spinning at times. At least it does mine.
 

deere6320

Well-Known Member
I went off and got a degree and an office job in a totally unrelated field if you'll pardon the pun.

I'm now at home milking cows fulltime while doing a few days a week in the office.

I am absolutely useless with my hands.

If I could go back and talk to my younger self I would have done a trade first.

Many of my contemporaries who did a trade progressed onto a related degree with the practical foundation provided by the apprenticeship to help carry them through.

I wouldn't recommend working in a totally unrelated industry at least try and have the skills be somewhat cross transferable.

Neither my degree nor my 'job' are in anyway related and having to cultivate a knowledge base and stay current in two completely different spheres will leave your head spinning at times. At least it does mine.
I understand that everyone thinks that a trade or even office job is a good idea,but if it really is truly impossible to convert the home place, then I’ll lease a place or relief milk, but I do agree that I should wait some time before I get stuck in ,but when I do get stuck in, if it’s still a viable business, dairying is the way I’m going to go. Thanks again to everyone
 

mixedbag

Well-Known Member
If you’re willing to lease out the home place you could put it on a tax free lease and use the income towards leasing a dairy farm which already has the facilities in place
 

humungus

Well-Known Member
I understand that everyone thinks that a trade or even office job is a good idea,but if it really is truly impossible to convert the home place, then I’ll lease a place or relief milk, but I do agree that I should wait some time before I get stuck in ,but when I do get stuck in, if it’s still a viable business, dairying is the way I’m going to go. Thanks again to everyone
everything the lads have said is true and given in good faith BUT jesus i admire your get up and go and part of me says go for it , if you want it bad enough you,ll suceed , you,ll do more work in your 20,s and 30s than you,ll do in the rest of your life and it,ll be enjoyable because you,ll be achieving what you want . i,m milking for 40 yrs now and i,m pissed off of it to be honest but as you get older the hunger goes out of you and you look forward to holidays and days off more than keeping another few cows
go and see a bit of the world but don,t leave it too long
 

towbar

Well-Known Member
@deere6320 worth watching ear to the ground tonight for a young lad who started small and plans to stay that way and seems to be making a decent hand of it
 
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