Winter wheat 2020

Discussion in 'Tillage' started by Louis mc, Sep 10, 2019.

  1. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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  2. Ags11

    Ags11 Well-Known Member

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    Indeed... 7 tonnes to the acre... :scratchhead:
     
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  3. marco

    marco Well-Known Member

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  4. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    I agree, a full run down on the approach used would be interesting so that perhaps we could all learn from it.

    6.5tn would do me.
     
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  5. Barrowsider

    Barrowsider Well-Known Member

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    The fact that the project was in conjunction with Bayer would make me more curious of the input costs. Impressive all the same.
     
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  6. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Moderator

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  7. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    You’d be a complete and utter Billy Big Balls if you managed the 7tn. Champagne lifestyle here we come, breakfast in bed in Kelly’s, all the 99 Ice Creams you can eat. Happy days.
     
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  8. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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  9. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    I believe the crop had 126 plants/m2 with ten tillers per plant!
    I think I have about 126 plants/m2 in some of ours this year, that’s about all I have in common with the NZ crop though....

    This is the NZ crop.
    05F14462-5528-4016-B14B-E82EFD0369F0.jpeg 8429042E-55D8-4664-A18F-EAB62F809DB1.jpeg
     
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  10. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Moderator

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    Mildew and septoria must not be much an issue in that area, if either got hold in a crop like that it would be all over
     
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  11. 6600

    6600 Well-Known Member

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    Sunlight is the big ingredient we miss here..
     
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  12. Iggy

    Iggy Well-Known Member

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    I think with that world record in wheat they use a yield monitor on the combine and some part of a field they get that top weight and it's recorded but if you average the whole field it would be much lower.
     
  13. Barrowsider

    Barrowsider Well-Known Member

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    I don’t believe this is the case. Spot yields on a combine yield monitor would not be thorough enough for a Guinness world record.
     
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  14. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    They do use a yield monitor but he said the monitor in his combine isn’t 100% accurate. He also said that the rules & preparation for the record attempt were quite complex so I’d say it must be well verified.
     
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  15. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    Looking at the pics above, I find it hard to believe that there are over 1000 ears/m2. However, they look extremely full. Very good looking width and length in them.

    I find it interesting looking at different wheat varieties trying to understand where the extra yield comes from.
    Obviously there are a number of factors at play.
    If I could achieve the big square full heads but also a high density of such heads then you’re well on the way.
    Unfortunately, normally when you get a high density the ears are shorter and have 3 grains across the spiklet as opposed to 5 on big ears with space around them.
     
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  16. KJL

    KJL Well-Known Member

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    It’s a great achievement to attain a yield like that. The fact that it was irrigated takes from it a bit though.
     
  17. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I agree. Normally, we get too much water - maybe we can take on the record using drainage!!
     
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  18. laoisfarmer

    laoisfarmer Well-Known Member

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    Plenty of Sunshine and irrigation..... Thought I read somewhere that when wheat is sown it starts with a max potential of 20 ton per acre, it’s how the crop is managed after that dictates how much of that can be achieved!!!!!!!!
     
  19. Barrowsider

    Barrowsider Well-Known Member

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    I wonder is the local weather data available to get an idea of the solar radiation during grain filling? Met.ie isnt doing much for the Southern Hemisphere.
     
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  20. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    This was applied to the crop apparently
    FA8DD9C3-B616-47AF-B6D3-35D427AD4516.jpeg
     
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  21. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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  22. marco

    marco Well-Known Member

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    2375 kgs of fert a hectare, Jesus that's crazy. You'd need over a tonne and a half an acre to pay for the fert and whatever it cost for the application
     
  23. 6600

    6600 Well-Known Member

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    Am I right that it works out at 242 units an acre? Not unreal excessive, given the tons produced. They have 20 hours of daylight in mid-summer, heat and unlimited water. The nearest equivalent to here is Scotland where they have had record yields too.
     
  24. Sheebadog

    Sheebadog Well-Known Member

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    Wheat so far.
    Average yield 7.6t/ha.
    Average moisture 11.7%.
    Average bushel 79kph.
    Average protein 12.9%.

    All over the weighbridge and divided into sfp acres.

    Should be finished today but the air con in the combine sprung a leak. Should finish tomorrow.

    The variety Absalon cut well above the average. Four different blocks of it did an average of 8.8t/ha with proteins of 12.4%. It was the only variety that got no fungicide and was clean to the bottom.
    @CORK might have it on trial?
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2020
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  25. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    Yep, 240 units N/acre. Certainly not crazy in my view.

    Equivalent in simple terms of applying 120 units of N to achieve 3.5tn of spring barley. Getting 3.5tn of barley from 120 units isn’t easy but can be achieved when everything is going right.
     
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