workshop hints and tips

Arthur

Well-Known Member
I had a MRI on my knee with the big plate in
Couldn't feel it pulling or anything but apparently the picture was crap because of the big shadow
I suppose they used something other than a bit of workshop offcut to plate you..
 

Kieran97

Well-Known Member
Metal plates used inside the body are generally a medical grade Titanium, not near as magnetic as steel.

Work now in hip replacements seeks to use Composite materials that are stronger in some places than others. Helps to spread the load more evenly throughout the femur

Functional grading is what it's called. Couldn't think of it.
 

scoffcruddle

Well-Known Member
Most important tip for the workshop . Always wear eye protection when using an angle grinder . (This from the man just home from a&e after getting steel removed from his eye :no: )

I’m the worst for not wearing goggles,it’s the nature of the job,if your grinding everyday you’d wear them all the time,just picking up the grinder to cut a bolt is the worst thing.
 

declanc304

Well-Known Member
Most important tip for the workshop . Always wear eye protection when using an angle grinder . (This from the man just home from a&e after getting steel removed from his eye :no: )

In work we learnt last week at a abrasive wheel course that d goggles were given to wear in d factory arent rated for grinding none of us realised it
 

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
Not so much workshop as wood shed tip here.


Aldi's big shopping bags are incredibly hardy and are ideal for bringing in wood for the fire.
 

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Kieran97

Well-Known Member
If you have a sliding door that slides in one direction, this is a good alternative to a door track I feel.

A length of angle turned on its edge, and a piece of plate welded to the girder. Any of those tracks in the ground end up getting bent and twisted.

Patent pending :Whistle2:
 

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lough

Well-Known Member
If you have a sliding door that slides in one direction, this is a good alternative to a door track I feel.

A length of angle turned on its edge, and a piece of plate welded to the girder. Any of those tracks in the ground end up getting bent and twisted.

Patent pending :Whistle2:

I have 5 like that here
 

marco

Well-Known Member
If you have a sliding door that slides in one direction, this is a good alternative to a door track I feel.

A length of angle turned on its edge, and a piece of plate welded to the girder. Any of those tracks in the ground end up getting bent and twisted.

Patent pending :Whistle2:
We have one where the yard is sloped, so the bottom of the door is at an angle. We put the angle midway up the door. Been here a good few years:fight::weld:
 

JohnBoy

Well-Known Member
I can carry mine in one hand so no, but i'd see no reason why it couldnt be done.

I saw these being used on something on youtube recently and they look ingenious. wouldnt take any abuse but they're only under load when you're moving the machine. I've seen lots of people fabricate similar solutions over the years but these are just a bolt on.

Only thing is these are only rated to 100lbs each, which isnt a lot when you're dragging something tall across a workshop floor.

but maybe someone does a heavier version?
 
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