Yorkshire boarding

AYF

Well-Known Member
@massey 6480
If its not too late.
Would some damp proof roll be an idea allong the horizontal timbers?
Ideally folded rite over the timber and held with the boarding.
The purlins are bound to get soaked.
 

paddy1001

Well-Known Member
@massey 6480
If its not too late.
Would some damp proof roll be an idea allong the horizontal timbers?
Ideally folded rite over the timber and held with the boarding.
The purlins are bound to get soaked.

Hi AYF,

Having replied to a number of members by pm enquiries on here re dpm on timbers supporting sheeting or cladding or any type of covering, so thought I would put my thoughts on dpm out there.

Dpm is designed to stop damp travelling through hardcore based substrates, concrete, brick, block, gravel etc, timber though, as a natural product needs to breathe, putting a dpm on any timber limits its ability to vent moisture naturally and traps the moisture between the living product and the plastic, yes it protects it from landing moisture but think about your own skin.
When it’s raining you put on wet gear to protect your skin from landing rain, but the minute the rain stops the wet gear comes off as you would start sweating beneath it and end up even more uncomfortable and unable to dry out, removing the wet gear prevents this. You cannot remove the wet gear on a shed when the rain stops so how does the shed stop the natural sweating?

Put the wet gear on to yourself on a warm day and see how you feel, not too happy I bet?

Another issue is in livestock housing, animal warm breath rising creates damp at roof level due top temp differences, the damp sits between dpm and timber and creates constant damp/rotting conditions.

Any sheds I have ever been on (quite a lot) the most dangerous ones had 4” dpm on top of the timbers, timbers felt solid but were mostly totally rotten. My closest call to injury was on a round roof shed housing cattle, stepping across sheeting over rotten timbers one gave way, I jumped to another one and landed on the clear sheet and supporting timber which gave way and sort of fell onto the truss where I managed by the grace of god to stop falling. Had to change the y’s and it was a long time before I felt comfortable on a roof.

Just my opinion and experiences but in all our refurbs, rebuilds and new builds I NEVER once put dpm on any timbers.

Paddy
 

paddy1001

Well-Known Member
Hi AYF,

Having replied to a number of members by pm enquiries on here re dpm on timbers supporting sheeting or cladding or any type of covering, so thought I would put my thoughts on dpm out there.

Dpm is designed to stop damp travelling through hardcore based substrates, concrete, brick, block, gravel etc, timber though, as a natural product needs to breathe, putting a dpm on any timber limits its ability to vent moisture naturally and traps the moisture between the living product and the plastic, yes it protects it from landing moisture but think about your own skin.
When it’s raining you put on wet gear to protect your skin from landing rain, but the minute the rain stops the wet gear comes off as you would start sweating beneath it and end up even more uncomfortable and unable to dry out, removing the wet gear prevents this. You cannot remove the wet gear on a shed when the rain stops so how does the shed stop the natural sweating?

Put the wet gear on to yourself on a warm day and see how you feel, not too happy I bet?

Another issue is in livestock housing, animal warm breath rising creates damp at roof level due top temp differences, the damp sits between dpm and timber and creates constant damp/rotting conditions.

Any sheds I have ever been on (quite a lot) the most dangerous ones had 4” dpm on top of the timbers, timbers felt solid but were mostly totally rotten. My closest call to injury was on a round roof shed housing cattle, stepping across sheeting over rotten timbers one gave way, I jumped to another one and landed on the clear sheet and supporting timber which gave way and sort of fell onto the truss where I managed by the grace of god to stop falling. Had to change the y’s and it was a long time before I felt comfortable on a roof.

Just my opinion and experiences but in all our refurbs, rebuilds and new builds I NEVER once put dpm on any timbers.

Paddy

Btw this is in no way a criticism of you @AYF , I have the greatest respect for you and really enjoy your input, many many farmers throughout Ireland want to insist on dpm on timbers, we always insisted on not doing it mostly for the reasons listed above
 

Bcl

Well-Known Member
I think the original reason for the dpm was that the timber preservative at some stage reacted with the surface coatings of the cladding and the dpm was only to isolate one from the other and nothing to do with damp or moisture as such.
They then changed the composition of the coatings to counteract this and thus there's been no requirement for dpm this good few years.
I totally agree with paddy above re the dpm causing timbers to rot.
Only used it on one roof ever and only cos the farmer dug his heels in insisting he wanted it.
 

AYF

Well-Known Member
Hi AYF,

Having replied to a number of members by pm enquiries on here re dpm on timbers supporting sheeting or cladding or any type of covering, so thought I would put my thoughts on dpm out there.

Dpm is designed to stop damp travelling through hardcore based substrates, concrete, brick, block, gravel etc, timber though, as a natural product needs to breathe, putting a dpm on any timber limits its ability to vent moisture naturally and traps the moisture between the living product and the plastic, yes it protects it from landing moisture but think about your own skin.
When it’s raining you put on wet gear to protect your skin from landing rain, but the minute the rain stops the wet gear comes off as you would start sweating beneath it and end up even more uncomfortable and unable to dry out, removing the wet gear prevents this. You cannot remove the wet gear on a shed when the rain stops so how does the shed stop the natural sweating?

Put the wet gear on to yourself on a warm day and see how you feel, not too happy I bet?

Another issue is in livestock housing, animal warm breath rising creates damp at roof level due top temp differences, the damp sits between dpm and timber and creates constant damp/rotting conditions.

Any sheds I have ever been on (quite a lot) the most dangerous ones had 4” dpm on top of the timbers, timbers felt solid but were mostly totally rotten. My closest call to injury was on a round roof shed housing cattle, stepping across sheeting over rotten timbers one gave way, I jumped to another one and landed on the clear sheet and supporting timber which gave way and sort of fell onto the truss where I managed by the grace of god to stop falling. Had to change the y’s and it was a long time before I felt comfortable on a roof.

Just my opinion and experiences but in all our refurbs, rebuilds and new builds I NEVER once put dpm on any timbers.

Paddy
Fair point when you think about it. Makes sense.

And don't worry, didnt think you were critisising, its what the forum is for!
 

Ptk44

Well-Known Member
Hi AYF,

Having replied to a number of members by pm enquiries on here re dpm on timbers supporting sheeting or cladding or any type of covering, so thought I would put my thoughts on dpm out there.

Dpm is designed to stop damp travelling through hardcore based substrates, concrete, brick, block, gravel etc, timber though, as a natural product needs to breathe, putting a dpm on any timber limits its ability to vent moisture naturally and traps the moisture between the living product and the plastic, yes it protects it from landing moisture but think about your own skin.
When it’s raining you put on wet gear to protect your skin from landing rain, but the minute the rain stops the wet gear comes off as you would start sweating beneath it and end up even more uncomfortable and unable to dry out, removing the wet gear prevents this. You cannot remove the wet gear on a shed when the rain stops so how does the shed stop the natural sweating?

Put the wet gear on to yourself on a warm day and see how you feel, not too happy I bet?

Another issue is in livestock housing, animal warm breath rising creates damp at roof level due top temp differences, the damp sits between dpm and timber and creates constant damp/rotting conditions.

Any sheds I have ever been on (quite a lot) the most dangerous ones had 4” dpm on top of the timbers, timbers felt solid but were mostly totally rotten. My closest call to injury was on a round roof shed housing cattle, stepping across sheeting over rotten timbers one gave way, I jumped to another one and landed on the clear sheet and supporting timber which gave way and sort of fell onto the truss where I managed by the grace of god to stop falling. Had to change the y’s and it was a long time before I felt comfortable on a roof.

Just my opinion and experiences but in all our refurbs, rebuilds and new builds I NEVER once put dpm on any timbers.

Paddy


Just checking If making a small garden shed would you put dpm between the floor/concrete and the timber frame?
 

Bcl

Well-Known Member
Just checking If making a small garden shed would you put dpm between the floor/concrete and the timber frame?
In that case yes I would, or definitely treat the timbers touching the concrete with protim or something similar
 

Vry

Well-Known Member
I think the space boards work well once you have a 7 ft wall under them they keep the air moving over the animals, not sure you would want them on the side of the prevailing wind . I treated them with protim or the like and need to do them again this summer. The timber soaks it in better when dry to. 20190610_201125.jpg
 
C

Cork

Guest
If you use Tegral sheeting on an agri shed, they specify to use dpm between the timber and cladding. If you don’t then the cladding warranty is void.

This certainly was the case but may have changed.

Interesting what Paddy said about timber rotting though....
 

massey 6480

Well-Known Member
Where did you get the boarding?
I think why my father doesn't like it is because it was up on a shed here before but it only had it on the front. If I was to put it up again it would be back and front.

Yours looks really good.
Our shed is visible to anyone that drives into the house, I think the boarding would look well
Of all places dairygold was the best value for the board`s . Didnt realise the boards were brown treated till they landed here had presumed they would just have a green tinge to them . They do look well in brown but i`d say no extra lifespan in the timber been brown . There was actually 3 green boards in the lot have them up on the inside .
 

Vry

Well-Known Member
I'd try and paint on another coat of protim before fitting them, the more the better. I put a few nuts in the can to help shake it up well a lot seems to sit in the bottom of the can and cant be got mixed without putting the nuts in the can.
 

lough

Well-Known Member
View attachment 72971 View attachment 72969
Pic is of Yorkshire boarding I’m putting up today 150 x 22 treated boards with a 50 mm opening between them . Nailed to 6x3 timbers . 6x3 are standing up so there’ll be a 3” space between the rows of boarding . (Only a single row up yet )The measurements above are what I decided on after reading countless threads on it on different forums . And having talked to an ‘expert’ about correct ventilation.

Is that on the prevailing wind side?
 

lough

Well-Known Member
Yes very much so . Facing south westerly and with little shelter from other building`s or hedges .

Would you find much difference even though the feed barrier is still open. I have an open fronted shed with an 8ft overhang facing the east and thought about doing the same.
 

massey 6480

Well-Known Member
Still a nice breeze / wind blows in under the boarding . But the shed is a lot nicer at the same time . As your shed is facing east you’d get away with just space boarding 1/2 the price . That shed was also open on the east side 7’ opening over a 7’ wall . Closed that off with a 6’ sheet of Galv and left the rest open .
 

mixedbag

Well-Known Member
That looks like space boarding, not Yorkshire boarding, or perhaps it’s just that it’s not finished?

Yorkshire boarding is 2 rows of boards staggered with each other
 

lough

Well-Known Member
View attachment 72971 View attachment 72969
Pic is of Yorkshire boarding I’m putting up today 150 x 22 treated boards with a 50 mm opening between them . Nailed to 6x3 timbers . 6x3 are standing up so there’ll be a 3” space between the rows of boarding . (Only a single row up yet )The measurements above are what I decided on after reading countless threads on it on different forums . And having talked to an ‘expert’ about correct ventilation.
Did you put the second row of boards on the inside of the shed rather than nail a 2 x 1 lath onto the boards you have in the picture.
Would you still recommend a 150 x 22 board with a 50mm gap if there was only a 1 inch spacing instead of a 3 inch spacing
 

FIAT 450

Well-Known Member
We're converting a straw shed here into a calf shed for an auto feeder.

We need to put something up on the front and sides for ventilation, by father doest want Yorkshire boarding he says- dont know why.
Vented sheeting isnt good enough
Any options. There will be 75 calves in that shed at peak
We have vented sheeting on our calf house and found it to cause a awful draft, we ended up having to put up a sheet on the bottom half to limit the amount of air coming in
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
We have vented sheeting on our calf house and found it to cause a awful draft, we ended up having to put up a sheet on the bottom half to limit the amount of air coming in

What brand of sheeting? We have the same here but It's high walls and finishing or store cattle in it so not an issue.
 

massey 6480

Well-Known Member
Yes a second row of timber 3” in side the outer one with a 50mm spacing between them . It’s a super job no rain getting in through the timber but plenty airflow .
An inch of a gap between the rows isn’t much . You’d really be restricting the airflow I’d say going that narrow. What direction is the shed facing.
Did you put the second row of boards on the inside of the shed rather than nail a 2 x 1 lath onto the boards you have in the picture.
Would you still recommend a 150 x 22 board with a 50mm gap if there was only a 1 inch spacing instead of a 3 inch spacing
 
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