Mchale vs Welger

Win

Well-Known Member
id like to see and try an inline set up on hills, accross being the one i would be more interested to try. Would like to thikn it would suit me but then again a combi baler might do as well if they ever get to fitting decent wheels. my krone combi on 600/55r26.5 was mighty but not fast enough for 6 layers, the 222.5 on a fusion or tandum axle on small wheels arent even close to it for floating on bad conditions
Across isn't too bad really its down hill that can be tricky due to the bale rolling back to the baler, if its too bad i reverse round to transfer and very often you'd have a bale wrapped so would need to turn across anyway. The one benefit a dedicated combi has over the inline is it has hold of the bale all the time so slopes don't affect it within reason whereas you do need to move the wrapper round on the inline to allow for the bale turning as it comes out of the chamber, once you get know where it needs to be it comes as second nature. Each has its good points and bad points!
 

newholland96

Well-Known Member
Across isn't too bad really its down hill that can be tricky due to the bale rolling back to the baler, if its too bad i reverse round to transfer and very often you'd have a bale wrapped so would need to turn across anyway. The one benefit a dedicated combi has over the inline is it has hold of the bale all the time so slopes don't affect it within reason whereas you do need to move the wrapper round on the inline to allow for the bale turning as it comes out of the chamber, once you get know where it needs to be it comes as second nature. Each has its good points and bad points!
You'd have to be on the ball all the time I'd imagine, if not paying attention, you'd do wreck. Are you working an inline system with long?
 

Win

Well-Known Member
You'd have to be on the ball all the time I'd imagine, if not paying attention, you'd do wreck. Are you working an inline system with long?
Yeah you do have to think but once the bale is in the loading arm the wrapper looks after itself, you can see all that's happening on the camera anyway. The wrapper has steering which makes working slopes easier, it will follow whether going backwards or forwards if needed. I've run it for 10 years at least maybe a tad longer, bought a dedicated combi last year which is very good at what it does but its very wide so we are limited to where we can get. Narrow lanes and tight gateways the inline wins every time, at the time it was a cheap way of having a combi and also being able to wrap for others when needed, would be very reluctant to do away with it, its not for everyone but it works well here!
 
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lough

Well-Known Member
id like to see and try an inline set up on hills, accross being the one i would be more interested to try. Would like to thikn it would suit me but then again a combi baler might do as well if they ever get to fitting decent wheels. my krone combi on 600/55r26.5 was mighty but not fast enough for 6 layers, the 222.5 on a fusion or tandum axle on small wheels arent even close to it for floating on bad conditions
What about the McHale with the extra wheels added to the axle, my contractor has it and there is another nearby and I think they done it themselves
 

ponderosa

Well-Known Member
What about the McHale with the extra wheels added to the axle, my contractor has it and there is another nearby and I think they done it themselves
you can get mchale on 650 or 710s also as far as i know. very wide on the road though
 

drew

Well-Known Member
The big thing I see is a combi is grand if your at silage 90% of the time but it’s a fair ol lump to have to drag around the days your only bailing hay or straw, for someone that bales a lot more hay or straw than silage an in-line May suit better if they can work it, and also means that you have the option to draw bales out before wrapping if you want to. I know with a combi you can make some use of it by grouping bales in 2’s when only bailing straw or hay but it’s not really that big of an advantage either
 

powerfarmer

Well-Known Member
Fast bale working near here. Have they been tested in Irish conditions yet I wonder.
I saw one in Moorepark 2 years ago, it was accompanied by a fusion and a service van and didn't look to be working very well. I pulled in to watch it , it packed up shortly after, service fellas were all over it with the covers open. I heard one fella telling the driver to get it away from the road so it was quickly taken away. Fusion finished the field
 

agrostar

Well-Known Member
I saw one in Moorepark 2 years ago, it was accompanied by a fusion and a service van and didn't look to be working very well. I pulled in to watch it , it packed up shortly after, service fellas were all over it with the covers open. I heard one fella telling the driver to get it away from the road so it was quickly taken away. Fusion finished the field
Alan McGraths one I think it’s gone now replaced with a Kuhn. He still has the two fusions I think
 

13spanner

Well-Known Member
Read somewhere that McHale were approached with the idea years ago but weren’t interested. I’d like to see it in a very heavy first cut.
 

agrostar

Well-Known Member
I’d imagine they would be no real advantage in Ireland with heavy crops and hilly difficult fields. The wrapper would be the limiting factor as you can only bale as fast as you can wrap. No advantage in hilly fields as bales would have to be placed across the hill anyway so you’d have to stop and reverse anyway. I’d imagine it would be a lot heavier than a fusion so no good on wet ground. Talking to some of the lads that drew away from the fast bale in kilworth and they reckoned the bales were as heavy as the fusion in the same field.
 

Bencroy

Well-Known Member
Mate sent me a snap of somewhere in cork of a lad with a newish looking fendt and a pottinger impress combi last night that he was setting up for him.crop was light, probaly was a paddock
 

powerfarmer

Well-Known Member
Krone have the Non stop Ultima but I don't think they are marketing it in Ireland.
I know a couple of Irish agri engineering companies have been looking at the non stop concept but nothing has gone further than the drawing board yet.
 
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