Ploughing tips and tricks

highlander

Well-Known Member
It's the bar type one that silage and you put in a pin.
I dont tho I have it solid?

in theory the landsides on the plough should keep the plough central without stabilizers, i normally run with a bit of play but not to much, if your in a field with side braes or shallow bits the plough can veer off to the side.
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
in theory the landsides on the plough should keep the plough central without stabilizers, i normally run with a bit of play but not to much, if your in a field with side braes or shallow bits the plough can veer off to the side.
It's usually my ends start to bow?
 
C

Cork

Guest
It's the bar type one that silage and you put in a pin.
I dont tho I have it solid?

Stabilizers definitely need to be moving free when the plough is in the ground. Your ploughing looks much tidier than grass ploughing I've done.

Maybe its our plough but ploughing grass fills me with dread and fear.
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
maybe your not 100% straight on when you lower the plough?
I had to be because the ends were so slippy I had to drive on the lands and side break into the furrow [emoji23]
It always happens me tho.
If its gone crocked up the feild how do you straighten it
 
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johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
Stabilizers definitely need to be moving free when the plough is in the ground. Your ploughing looks much tidier than grass ploughing I've done.

Maybe its our plough but ploughing grass fills me with dread and fear.
Would it not slap about then when your turning.
Your plough is definitely better than mine.
It's a hoor of a yoke to get set up.
Even at that you can still see where I went up and down.
I'd never get it to look harrowed like you would
 

candor

Moderator/IT Guy
I had to be because the ends were so slippy I had to drive on the lands and side break into the furrow [emoji23]
It always happens me tho.
If its gone crocked up the feild how do you straighten it

You generally can steer the curve out of it or if it's really bad do a short to straighten it.
 

highlander

Well-Known Member
What like keep tight to the furrow wall and as you come out of the curve keep over toward the turned over bit?

yep, you just have to try and iron out the kinks as they develop, if your in a pig of a field with side braes its very difficult, imho straightness comes second to turning it over properly:thumbup:
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
yep, you just have to try and iron out the kinks as they develop, if your in a pig of a field with side braes its very difficult, imho straightness comes second to turning it over properly[emoji106]
That's another thing.
Sometimes it won't turn over the sod fully.
Next run then it could be perfect.
Whys that?
 

ithastopay

Well-Known Member
It's the bar type one that silage and you put in a pin.
I dont tho I have it solid?

I thought it was on a 20 series, have a look at it, id say it would work better when you lift the plough the stabiliser should catch and if the chain is set right it will release when the plough hits the ground, when you drop your wheel into the furrow the plough is falling towards the ploughing causing the plough to start off taking a smaller bite as it starts to plough this is what causes the bow at the ends, if that makes sense.
 

ithastopay

Well-Known Member
That's another thing.
Sometimes it won't turn over the sod fully.
Next run then it could be perfect.
Whys that?

Rule number one when ploughing, only change one thing at a time, id always do two runs after changing any setting.
Rule number two, go back to rule number one.
Make sure the lift arms are level, check the depth of the front and back furrows, put a level on the side onthe beam of the plough, it should be level ploughing both ways.
Through up a few more pictures, it looks to me like the plough is a bit shallow on the back sod.
 

highlander

Well-Known Member
That's another thing.
Sometimes it won't turn over the sod fully.
Next run then it could be perfect.
Whys that?

seen that on my plough at times, seemed to happen on shallow bits or if its really dry, my theory is because the plough was running on the hard there was no "hinge" left on the furrow, if you know what i mean, the furrow was just lifting off the ground and then being thrown sideways rather than turn over. only other thing is going too deep.
 
G

guest 1

Guest
I'd take the stabilisers off the tractor altogether sooner than work with them tight. Try and get another few pics of the plough in work, in one of the pics it looks like the front sod is narrower and deeper than the back. If you throw a straight edge at a right angle across the ploughing it will tell you if your sods are even or not. Does the top link pin go in a hole or a slot?
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
I'd have the stabilisers tight on near enough everything I'd put on??
I couldn't stand it waging behind me.
I was trying to plough shallow but yes it's not dead level.
Went to adjust the drop arms and they were seized up so I couldn't fool with that.
The toplink can go in a hole or a slot which is best?
 

highlander

Well-Known Member
I'd have the stabilisers tight on near enough everything I'd put on??
I couldn't stand it waging behind me.
I was trying to plough shallow but yes it's not dead level.
Went to adjust the drop arms and they were seized up so I couldn't fool with that.
The toplink can go in a hole or a slot which is best?

plough is not meant to be held with the stabilizers, the landsides are there to keep the plough straight, if your holding the plough in a position it doesn't naturally want to be in with stabilizers then its a recipe for a mess.

if you have a working depth wheel on the plough and lower link sensing then top link in slotted hole
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
plough is not meant to be held with the stabilizers, the landsides are there to keep the plough straight, if your holding the plough in a position it doesn't naturally want to be in with stabilizers then its a recipe for a mess.

if you have a working depth wheel on the plough and lower link sensing then top link in slotted hole
Aye but if I have them off when I lift at the headlands and turn is it not just going to slap sideways full force?
Start a new thread and I will transfer the posts over
Dome
 

highlander

Well-Known Member
Aye but if I have them off when I lift at the headlands and turn is it not just going to slap sideways full force?

i only run mine with a couple of inches play either side of central. if you get out of the tractor with the plough in the ground there shouldn't be strain in the stabilizers.

cant you position the in end of your stabilizers in a higher hole so they tighten as the arms lift?
 

SMID

Well-Known Member
I'd have the stabilisers tight on near enough everything I'd put on??
I couldn't stand it waging behind me.
I was trying to plough shallow but yes it's not dead level.
Went to adjust the drop arms and they were seized up so I couldn't fool with that.
The toplink can go in a hole or a slot which is best?
There will plenty of folk on here better acquainted with JD hydraulics Id be working in the slotted hole . When your working as shallow as the pic shows the plough needs to be carrying a lot of its weight on the depth wheel not the best for traction though but variation in the depth will make a big difference in it ability to turn an even furrow , mind you Id have the the red one it:D
 

johndeere6920s

Well-Known Member
i only run mine with a couple of inches play either side of central. if you get out of the tractor with the plough in the ground there shouldn't be strain in the stabilizers.

cant you position the in end of your stabilizers in a higher hole so they tighten as the arms lift?
I can actually yes depth wheels taken off it.
Tbh its been all Bog I've ploughed upto now and it was only a hindrance.
The red one won't work on it tyres are too wide.
Besides I'm devoted to the green one 95%of the time
There will plenty of folk on here better acquainted with JD hydraulics Id be working in the slotted hole . When your working as shallow as the pic shows the plough needs to be carrying a lot of its weight on the depth wheel not the best for traction though but variation in the depth will make a big difference in it ability to turn an even furrow , mind you Id have the the red one it:D
 

nashmach

Well-Known Member
Rule number one when ploughing, only change one thing at a time, id always do two runs after changing any setting.
Rule number two, go back to rule number one.
Make sure the lift arms are level, check the depth of the front and back furrows, put a level on the side onthe beam of the plough, it should be level ploughing both ways.
Through up a few more pictures, it looks to me like the plough is a bit shallow on the back sod.

I'd take the stabilisers off the tractor altogether sooner than work with them tight. Try and get another few pics of the plough in work, in one of the pics it looks like the front sod is narrower and deeper than the back. If you throw a straight edge at a right angle across the ploughing it will tell you if your sods are even or not. Does the top link pin go in a hole or a slot?

Was just going to say your sods aren't even there, might want to stop in furrow and get out with the tape. Looks like the front one is narrow and driving it up higher.

Are your landslides perpendicular to the furrow wall?

You might need to let the crosshaft a shake.
 
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