Swapping farm yard manure/dung for straw.

Discussion in 'Tillage' started by massey 6480, Mar 12, 2013.

  1. massey 6480

    massey 6480 Well-Known Member

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    Just wondering if any of you lad`s at tillage takes straw bedding of customer`s who have bought straw off you . Have a heap of it here from the last 2 year`s and have ground to spread it on which we plan on reseeding . But it is a fair distance from the yard and will be expensive to move. So was thinking of mentioning it to the contractor who would be spreading it and also the local tillage farm if he would be interested in taking it .
     
  2. nashmach

    nashmach Moderator

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    If you have the land to spread it on; I'd find it hard to give away the nutrients in the dung.
     
  3. massey 6480

    massey 6480 Well-Known Member

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    Have the land allright but 6 miles from the yard bit far for a spreader to be hauling .
     
  4. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    the dung heap was a mans wealth in times gone by, Wouldnt part with dung for love or money, haul it with trucks if its that far away. Wont miss shifting a big heap with trucks and you will get over 20t in a load

    if its in the heap 2 years it will be well broken down, spin it out on grassland with a rear discharge. I would travel a fair distance for composted FYM
     
  5. nashmach

    nashmach Moderator

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    Trailer it there??
     
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  6. massey 6480

    massey 6480 Well-Known Member

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    Was planning on spreading it on ground that`s to be reseeded .Will ask if he`s up to hauling it back in trailer`s and then spread it . Know it`s great at growing grass all right great if it can be spread in the autumn and let rot over the winter problem is spreading in spring and cattle will resist eating the grass for the year.
     
  7. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    I dont know where people get this idea from. I spread straight out of one of the sheds onto grassland last week which is far from ideal but this will be grazed again in 28 days from date of spreading.

    If its sitting in a heap for 2 years and spread with rear discharge it should be like compost and able to be grazed after a few weeks. I remember spreading such stuff in May last year on grassland. cattle grazed soon after a few showers of rain. I would be out with the shovel seeing whats going on under neath if its taking months on end for the earthworms to drag it down
     
  8. massey 6480

    massey 6480 Well-Known Member

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    It`s not all 2yr`s old have been adding to it this winter as well . Have spread it in the spring before and cattle just didn`t like grazing the field`s where it was spread .
     
  9. ithastopay

    ithastopay Well-Known Member

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    I wouldnt be giving it away if you can use it, we moved stuff from home to stubbles in trailers about 6 miles.
     
  10. nashmach

    nashmach Moderator

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    I'm with Ozzy here - spread some here the Saturday before the Ploughing Match and cattle were grazing it again by November 1st - in fact they actually preferred it.

    Never had that issue here although I do think we go too heavy in one coat here and maybe better of with just a light coat over more acres.
     
  11. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    Pity you're so far away - I'd love some!!!

    Dung beats slurry any day in my opinion....
     
  12. 49801

    49801 Well-Known Member

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    get it hauled to the field and spread it after its burned off.
    you'll be cultivating the field anyway I assume.
     
  13. Chewdles

    Chewdles Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't get rid of it for love nor money.it's not just the fertilizer value of the dung, imo it gives land body which you wont get from bagged fertilizer or slurry.
    i suppose you could call it a soil conditioner.
     
  14. CORK

    CORK Well-Known Member

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    +1
     
  15. Big Vern

    Big Vern Well-Known Member

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    in a word yes our neighbour, he is stockless arable, (spuds n cereals-pulses) all his straw is bought by 2 dairy farmers, they bale and haul it, wheat straw, bean haulm, pea haulm, rape straw barley all of it, covert it to FYM and haul it all back , stock pile it on a huge concrete pad that bulker has and then come and spread it, he does nowt, seems a good deal to me, the only stock he has are about 25 ewes..
     
  16. Skimmer

    Skimmer Well-Known Member

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    Resurrecting this thread!!! I have a neighbour about 2.5 miles from me who buys all his oat and barley straw off of us. He is going to be clearing out the sheds shortly, not entirely sure how much dung he has at the moment. We talked about possibly exchanging dung for straw, and I was wondering what would be a fair way for both parties to complete this arrangement? As in, do I haul it and pay for it to be spread, or does he haul it etc. He would normally buy about 300 welger made round bales off of us if that is any use. Thanks!!!!
     
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  17. nashmach

    nashmach Moderator

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    Did the same thing here interhousehold, closer to five miles though.

    I paid MF for spreading it, did the hauling myself and paid for the nominal cost of it. At this stage I reckon, it's no cheaper to bag fert but I'm holding judgement to see if I get a year 2 kick and as always said there is something in the dung...

    Fairest arrangement is for you to draw and spread I would think but he pays for the baling.
     
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  18. Oakley

    Oakley Well-Known Member

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    Dung is a very variable product and it's nutrient value will depend on the diet of the animal. If you were to take back all the straw in the form of dung, the P+k value would very roughly be about €1500. When straw was €10/bale maybe it would be a runner to let the other person bale it themselves, draw back the dung and spread it for you otherwise you are effectively "buying any benefit".
    If you can do a deal so as the dung those not cost you anymore than the nutrient value and any extra added benefit from the dung is free then its def worth considering
     
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  19. Blackwater boy

    Blackwater boy Moderator

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    He pays for the baling, he draws the bales and draws the dung back and spreads it for you.
     
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  20. MF30

    MF30 Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like the better deal, you are supplying the fresh product albeit a byproduct of grain produce and he is supplying/getting rid of his final byproduct. Straw today is worth around €250 acre when 8 bales/acre @ €30 bale...that'd buy nearly a ton of CAN per acre. Dung is valuable but so was straw at €10 bale. As mentioned before there's dung from finishers and there's other dung...with dock seeds and thistle seeds to mention but a few.
     
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  21. Skimmer

    Skimmer Well-Known Member

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    He bales and draws away the straw as is. He is a regular customer, so we charged a reasonable I think €20 a bale. Wouldn't have gotten any more than 4 to 5 bales to the acre for the barley straw, probably around 9 to 10 for the oat straw. He would be a good farmer and his silage ground would be clean. Thanks for the advice lads, much appreciated!!!!!!!:Thumbp2:
     
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  22. nashmach

    nashmach Moderator

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    Need to edit that, I ended up with about 2.25 'bales' of dung to each bale of straw which is why I reckoned my arrangement was fair at the time.

    So that's a bit different than yours :blushing:, so Oakley and BB are about right.

    I wouldn't be comparing the cost to straw at anything near 30 a bale though, better to look at it on a long term basis and would compare it to 10-10-20 price more so.

    It goes without saying you want some control over spreading too for compaction and also evenness of spread....
     
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  23. Ozzy Scott

    Ozzy Scott Well-Known Member

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    just charge market rates for everything. straw baled in the field €20, haulage say €3. FYM in yard €12 a ton, haulage €45 an hour. who every is quitest at each time does the work at contractor rates
     
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  24. Rebelman

    Rebelman Well-Known Member

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    Maybe I’m being too simplistic here but personally I don’t agree with swapping straw for FYM in any arrangement. Lots of heavily stocked farmers need to export FYM for nitrate purposes to tillage farmers. I’m happy with this arrangement as I get FYM and stock farmer solves his/her nitrate issues. Win win on both sides. Why would I even consider giving my straw for free into the bargain???
     
  25. Bog Man

    Bog Man Well-Known Member

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    What is the value of cattle slurry/ 1000 gals . They are being fed sugar beet and maize and are fattening big cattle. Export paper work would be done.
     

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