Peas

Barrowsider

Well-Known Member
No pea thread so I'll post here. Sowed Venture peas @ 140 kg/ha yesterday before rain stopped play. Our first spring using a front press and it certainly leaves a nicer finish. Hopefully it will help reduce the incidence of nutrient uptake deficiencies, particularly in the event of a dry April.



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TM155

Well-Known Member
Nice and dry there. Never grew them but i reckon some land around here would suit peas. Have you been growing them for long? Are they very hard to harvest?
 

Barrowsider

Well-Known Member
Growing them longer than the father can remember and he's in his mid 60's so yes a long time. They prefer light land and grow particularly well in virgin soil. Peas have rightfully earned a reputation as being very difficult to harvest over the years but modern varieties have a greater standing ability. Unless you get an exceptionally wet summer they're not that difficult to harvest anymore.
 

TM155

Well-Known Member
Growing them longer than the father can remember and he's in his mid 60's so yes a long time. They prefer light land and grow particularly well in virgin soil. Peas have rightfully earned a reputation as being very difficult to harvest over the years but modern varieties have a greater standing ability. Unless you get an exceptionally wet summer they're not that difficult to harvest anymore.
Are they similarly grown to beans? What kind of yield and price could be expected?
Keep us updated on them throughout the year...
 

Barrowsider

Well-Known Member
What fungicides are ye allowed use on peas?
The traditional fungicide mix was Amistar + Bravo (A. Opti) until Signum was cleared for use a couple of years ago. We apply 1 dose of 1.25kg/ha at early flowering. In a wet season it is recommended to go back again after 14 days but we try to avoid it as the crop tends to grow rapidly at this time and the sprayer does a lot more damage during the 2nd application. The main diseases are mildew and botrytis.
 

Barrowsider

Well-Known Member
Are they similarly grown to beans? What kind of yield and price could be expected?
Keep us updated on them throughout the year...
A similarly low input crop. Easier to keep disease free and a more "normal" harvest date but a higher risk of yield loss during a difficult summer. 2T/ac is a respectable yield but up to 3T is possible in fresh ground during a favourable season. Price varies considerably with quality with a nice premium over feed peas/beans.
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
@CORK, is forage pea seed easily got? thinking of Direct drilling some into grass, cut in 3 months and back in with grass. Should I sow some barley to keep them standing?
 

gone

Well-Known Member
@CORK, is forage pea seed easily got? thinking of Direct drilling some into grass, cut in 3 months and back in with grass. Should I sow some barley to keep them standing?
The English mix peas and a small bit of SOSRape to keep it standing.
 

Ozzy Scott

Well-Known Member
The English mix peas and a small bit of SOSRape to keep it standing.
interesting, Would SOSR cut after 12-14 weeks only make the forage pure cabbage, at least barley after 14 weeks would be starting to turn. This probably wont be sown until the 1st of May as I will be short on grass up to that point
 

Blackwater boy

Moderator
@CORK, is forage pea seed easily got? thinking of Direct drilling some into grass, cut in 3 months and back in with grass. Should I sow some barley to keep them standing?
I'd imagine a low than normal
Seeding rate would do and they would stand then. Could you DD the grass and a low rate of peas together maybe?
 

Rebelman

Well-Known Member
@CORK, is forage pea seed easily got? thinking of Direct drilling some into grass, cut in 3 months and back in with grass. Should I sow some barley to keep them standing?
Interesting. When u say cut, do u mean cut and bale?? Excuse my ignorance...didn't even know forage peas existed!!!!
 

Barrowsider

Well-Known Member
Peas are up and away without too much attention from our feathered friends. Averaging 60 plants per m2 which is 10 plants below what is considered the optimum but as they were planted a little thin it's no surprise. Thin plants tend to pod more too so not worried. Could do with a little drink and some kind weather. image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg
 
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